Oregon's Vistas May Get Less Scenic ; Long a Model for Protecting Rural Areas, the State Faces a Property- Rights Backlash That Could Ripple Nationwide

By Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Oregon's Vistas May Get Less Scenic ; Long a Model for Protecting Rural Areas, the State Faces a Property- Rights Backlash That Could Ripple Nationwide


Brad Knickerbocker writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When voters in Oregon recently approved significant changes in the state's unique land-use law, many property owners won an important victory. Now, local officials must either compensate owners for regulations that reduce a property's value or waive those restrictions.

But approval of the controversial ballot measure here also signals what is likely to be a nationwide examination of government efforts to prevent sprawl, preserve farmland, and protect vistas. This is especially true since Measure 37, as it was called, parallels the growing effort to change the federal Endangered Species Act in order to give more slack to farmers, developers, and other private property owners.

"I believe that Measure 37 or variations of it will soon sprout in other states," says Dave Hunnicutt, executive director for Oregonians In Action, the property rights group that successfully convinced 60 percent of voters here to approve it and now is getting calls from around the country. "It represents the chance to prove that you can achieve a balance between good land-use planning and the protection of people's rights and investment in their land."

Other property rights advocates agree, although they warn of a backlash if the public perceives that a few landowners are responsible for spoiling the landscape. Most people still don't like developments where cows used to graze.

"If other private property groups don't get greedy and don't go too far, my guess is they will have some success," predicts Chuck Cushman, founder of the American Land Rights Association in Battleground, Wash.

At the base is the longstanding debate over individual rights versus the public good.

Former Gov. Tom McCall (R) warned the state legislature in 1973 that "coastal condomania, sagebrush subdivisions, and the ravenous rampage of suburbia ... all threaten to mock Oregon's status as the environmental model of this nation."

That year, Oregon enacted requirements that local plans meet statewide growth and planning goals. Several years later, a Land Use Board of Appeals was created to settle local land use disputes. Over the years, nearly a dozen states (among them, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Maine, Vermont, and Washington) adopted strong land use laws as well.

Meanwhile, state and federal courts began ruling in cases involving the "taking" of private property through government restrictions on what the owner could do with the land. …

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