Wolfowitz at World Bank: A Bumpy Ride? ; Bush's Nomination Is Seen as Complicating Efforts to Smooth out Relations with Other Nations

By Howard LaFranchi and David R. Francis writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 17, 2005 | Go to article overview

Wolfowitz at World Bank: A Bumpy Ride? ; Bush's Nomination Is Seen as Complicating Efforts to Smooth out Relations with Other Nations


Howard LaFranchi and David R. Francis writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


President Bush Wednesday nominated Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz, a principal architect of the Iraq war and a chief target of US foreign-policy critics, to head the World Bank.

Announcing the nomination at a White House press conference, Mr. Bush indicated that he knew it would be controversial when he said he hoped people would "get to know Paul better before a vote is taken." Bush called Mr. Wolfowitz a "skilled diplomat" who as a former ambassador to Indonesia - the world's largest Muslim country - showed his "compassion" and "commitment to development."

By tradition the US names the head of the World Bank, an international institution based in Washington that focuses on development in poorer countries. The nomination must be approved by other bank members. And although Bush said he was "pleased" that "world leaders" he contacted by phone had listened to his reasoning for the nomination, most observers expect a bumpy ratification process.

The nomination follows last week's naming of John Bolton as US ambassador to the United Nations, another nomination seen by many as going against the grain of Bush administration efforts to smooth relations with the rest of the world after the Iraq war.

Calling the Wolfowitz nomination "a slap in the face" to Europe and a cold shower on the good feelings left by Bush's recent trip to Europe, one European diplomat said, "These two nominations portend a not very good time ahead."

Adding that European countries the diplomat knew of "did everything we could to prevent" the Wolfowitz nomination, the diplomat says, "the lack of consultation and willingness to listen that this suggests does not support what we understood was to be a new style."

Wolfowitz would replace outgoing World Bank President James Wolfensohn, who issued a statement Wednesday supporting the nomination, although earlier this month he had doused speculation about a Wolfowitz nomination. Pentagon officials had suggested that Wolfowitz wanted to stay at the Defense Department.

The US has said it hopes to see a new president in place before Wolfensohn departs in June, after 10 years in the job. But the European diplomat suggests a vote by the bank's broad of governors could still prove nettlesome.

Wolfowitz has come under particular criticism from Democrats, who have scorned his predictions that the Iraq war would cost little and that US troops on the ground would be quickly replaced by Iraqi forces. Wednesday House minority leader Nancy Pelosi quipped: "Maybe this is the president's way of removing [Wolfowitz] from the Defense Department."

Still, others see different motivations in Bush's nomination. For one thing, it follows in the logic of the Bolton nomination, some say, in that Wolfowitz is seen by administration supporters as not a gratuitous critic of international organizations, but one who wants them to work more effectively at their goals.

Others note that Wolfowitz going to the World Bank after the Iraq War would follow the example of former Defense Secretary Robert MacNamara, who headed the global institution after the Vietnam War. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wolfowitz at World Bank: A Bumpy Ride? ; Bush's Nomination Is Seen as Complicating Efforts to Smooth out Relations with Other Nations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.