Libraries Are an Essential Service, Too

By Ecenbarger, William | The Christian Science Monitor, March 11, 2005 | Go to article overview

Libraries Are an Essential Service, Too


Ecenbarger, William, The Christian Science Monitor


The Lancaster County Library traces its roots back to 1759, when 54 local residents anted up three guineas each and began buying books. Ben Franklin himself marveled at their initiative, and among the first directors was George Ross, who later would sign the Declaration of Independence.

For nearly 250 years this library and its antecedents have afforded patrons, regardless of economic circumstance, a mind- boggling collection of materials representing 50 centuries of human thought. Plato and Santayana, Shakespeare and Hemingway, Bacon and Darwin stand shoulder to shoulder on its shelves. The library is also a place to learn English, look for a job, read to children, do a term paper, or simply to oil a squeaky day.

But this tradition has been shrinking steadily in recent years. Needed building maintenance has been put off, reserve funds have been tapped, and, worst of all, book purchases have been canceled. Even this hasn't been enough to steer clear of the fiscal shoals; as of last month, the library and its three branches are open 60 fewer hours every week. In addition, 22 part-time positions were eliminated.

Much the same is happening all over the US. The public library - an American institution older than the flag, envy of other nations, cradle of literacy, bootstrap for generations of immigrants, storehouse of fuel for the imagination, hotbed of adventure and romance, and one of the greatest democratic institutions ever created - is struggling to survive. This is nothing less than a national calamity.

There are about 9,000 public libraries in the United States, and counting their branches there are some 16,000 places that an American can borrow a book without charge. By every available measure, public libraries are enjoying record levels of popularity, regularly serving from a third to a half of the population and each year lending out more than a billion books, periodicals, and other materials.

Despite their reputation for stuffiness, libraries are action- oriented. Almost from the beginning, libraries were a kind of all- encompassing social-service agency, and today they are meccas for the unemployed, the undereducated, and the newly immigrated. Libraries are used by doctoral candidates and high school dropouts. Businessmen come for seminars on good management, teenagers come for information on AIDS, and "latchkey" children come after school lets out.

Although most librarians say the word "fee" as though it soils their lips, we are already in the era of the not-quite-so-free public library. …

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