Aid Groups' Next Task: Keeping World Engaged ; Government Pledges for Disaster Relief Are Often Delayed or Forgotten, Say Organizations

By Scott Baldauf writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 18, 2005 | Go to article overview

Aid Groups' Next Task: Keeping World Engaged ; Government Pledges for Disaster Relief Are Often Delayed or Forgotten, Say Organizations


Scott Baldauf writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


For the victims of last year's flooding in the Philippines and Bangladesh, the United Nations estimated that $6.4 million would be needed. But only 5 percent of pledged donations have been delivered. In Grenada, last fall's hurricane victims have seen only 14 percent of a promised $27.6 million.

Could the same happen with Asia's tsunami-relief effort?

Relief organizations say they are bracing for the moment the news media drifts to other stories. If the past is a predictor, promises of aid will be delayed, diminished, or forgotten.

The Dec. 26 tsunami has already proved to be a history-defying event, with donations topping previous records. To date, the UN has received $717 million of the promised $4 billion from donor nations, and aid groups plan to harness the unprecedented public interest and involvement to keep pressure on donor governments over the long haul.

Still, garnering initial pledges represents only half the battle, say relief organizations. Sustaining the world's attention and keeping momentum going through the rebuilding process, they say, may be the stiffest challenge to any major relief effort.

"This is a big issue for us," says Elizabeth Griffin, director of media relations for Catholic Relief Services in Baltimore. "When a natural disaster strikes, and there is immediate media attention, then people get mobilized to act. When the media leaves, people think the problem has been resolved, but that is when our job begins."

The sad fact, Ms. Griffin says, is that aid groups are often working on several relief efforts at a time, some that get media attention, some that don't, but all of which have a profound impact on some of the world's poorest regions.

Just before the tsunami struck, Catholic Relief Services warned of a food-aid crisisas the US Congress had cut back food relief for disasters - in a year of massive need, from the flooding in the Philippines and Bangladesh to the war in Congo to the near genocide of refugees in the camps of Sudan's Darfur region.

Private aid groups like Catholic Relief Services, CARE international, Doctors Without Borders, Oxfam, and the Red Cross and Red Crescent societies are often among the first to respond to such tragedies. But private aid groups often cannot provide the comprehensive aid and reconstruction that a government or an institution like the World Bank can provide, experts say. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Aid Groups' Next Task: Keeping World Engaged ; Government Pledges for Disaster Relief Are Often Delayed or Forgotten, Say Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.