Latin America Leans Clean ; Electing Leftists Isn't as Critical as Fighting Corruption

By The Monitor's View | The Christian Science Monitor, March 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

Latin America Leans Clean ; Electing Leftists Isn't as Critical as Fighting Corruption


The Monitor's View, The Christian Science Monitor


Oh, what a decade of stagnation can do. With all the conformity of a flock of birds turning left, South American voters in recent elections have turned away politicians who had pushed open-market policies in the 1990s. Last week, that regional trend was solidified with the inauguration of a leftist president in Uruguay, a doctor named Tabare Vazquez who promises to cure poverty.

Now, with this electoral veering, three-quarters of South Americans are governed by parties offering more social services and a stronger government hand in the economy - albeit with more pragmatic regard for market realities than leftist leaders of decades past.

But this popular backlash against what's called "neoliberal" economics may really be misplaced.

The open-market policies pushed on the region by the United States and the International Monetary Fund did suppress the inflation that had ravaged South America and led to sell-offs of inefficient state enterprises. At the same time, promises of high economic growth, reduced poverty, and less income inequality weren't really fulfilled.

In the narrow debate between left and right economics, the right took it on the chin. Voters flew to the left, more out of political exasperation than nostalgic embrace.

Anticorruption campaign

But something else is happening in South America these days that may have a better chance of boosting lackluster economies: a regionwide campaign against official corruption.

The art of stealing in high places is well practiced in these countries. A 2003 survey by the World Economic Forum of business leaders found that seven of the 10 countries with consistently high measures of political corruption are in Latin America. And within the region, 90 percent of people in a UN survey said they believe graft is worsening; many see corruption as their nations' biggest problem.

Countries that effectively address corruption and improve the rule of law can quadruple their national incomes, the World Bank claims. Corruption's worst effects are a dangerous erosion in popular respect for democracy and a scaring off of foreign investors and traders.

So, what's being done about bribery and other forms of graft? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Latin America Leans Clean ; Electing Leftists Isn't as Critical as Fighting Corruption
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.