Letters

The Christian Science Monitor, August 31, 2005 | Go to article overview

Letters


No Marian the Librarian to be found at the University of Texas

As a professional librarian at the University of Texas, I am perplexed by the portrayal of the university's undergraduate library in the Aug. 23 article "Academic libraries empty stacks for online centers."

Even before the transformation to digital learning center, there were no "Quiet Please" signs; the food policy, revised three years ago, allowed carry-in food items; and professional librarians rarely shelved books because we had student staff dedicated for that task.

Contrary to the impression given in the article, the library is not and was not a "dusty" hall, but rather a dynamic facility, bustling with student activity throughout the semester and run by highly dedicated staff determined to help students not only find what they are looking for, but find the fun in learning. That's because the undergraduate library has long led the University of Texas Libraries in the realm of cutting-edge, student- oriented services and innovative changes in the field of librarianship.

The removal of books to create enhanced digital study space is just one point in the evolution of a facility that has always been at the forefront of undergraduate needs. Lindsey Schell Austin, Texas

Dangers of democracy in Egypt

It was about time someone noticed the tight relationship between democracy and the politico-religious situation in some Arab or Muslim countries. Your comments on the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt ("Bush's antiterrorism formula," Aug. 25 editorial) hit the nail on the head.

As a modern, tolerant, and educated Egyptian, I do not want the Muslim Brotherhood in power in my country. It is easy for you, in America, to speak pearls of wisdom about democracy, but I hope that after 9/11 and all the new laws to "fight terror" that your administration is passing, your perspective has changed somewhat.

Perhaps you can now better understand the dangers for us. Your editorial asks the question, "What if democracy opens the door to Islamist rule?" and that means that you can now see something you did not see some years ago. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.