Businesses' Options: Stay or Go ; Katrina May Knock Small Firms - Especially Minority-Owned Ones - out of Business

By Sara B. Miller and Amanda Paulson writers of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Businesses' Options: Stay or Go ; Katrina May Knock Small Firms - Especially Minority-Owned Ones - out of Business


Sara B. Miller and Amanda Paulson writers of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The fate of Wet Dog Glass hangs in the balance.

The roof is off the studio that housed the glass-blowing equipment. Owners Angela Bernard and her husband knew that right away from aerial pictures of New Orleans posted online.

"With something like this, you have to make the decision whether you want to go on," said Ms. Bernard, who had not yet been back to the city.

To rebuild or relocate is a dilemma facing many small-business owners along the hurricane-damaged Gulf Coast. It's an especially difficult choice for the Bernards and other minority entrepreneurs.

Their businesses, concentrated in the service and retail industries, were hit disproportionately hard, and community leaders worry their loss could threaten minority employment and unravel the social fabric of neighborhoods in the Gulf.

Unlike larger corporations, some of which have already relocated to temporary headquarters in Baton Rouge, La., or Houston, many small-business owners depend on community contact with their customers. Many have lost not only their shops, but also their client base, employees, and any hope of a quick return to normal business.

"The neighbors are gone. The route you walked to the grocery store is gone," Bernard says.

In largely African-American east Biloxi, many businesses had closed their doors long before Katrina, driven out by gangs and drugs. But community leaders say those that stuck it out - like Inez's Lounge & Cafe, or Tyrone's Barber & Beauty Shop - anchored the community and gave hope that east Biloxi could join in the revitalization taking place in other cities.

Now, in Katrina's aftermath, some entrepreneurs here are considering closing, or relocating to other cities. Either choice would set back a region trying to rebuild.

"I never thought I'd be in this shape," says Inez Thomas, who has cooked soul food in the same location for 17 years and calls her customers family. The water rose to the 11th step of her cafe's staircase; in one day she lost her business, her home, and her car. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Businesses' Options: Stay or Go ; Katrina May Knock Small Firms - Especially Minority-Owned Ones - out of Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.