Thirteen Rainbows ... and More! ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, December 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Thirteen Rainbows ... and More! ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life


I have two delightful paintings on my office wall. One, by one of my granddaughters, 6-year-old Brittany. The other, by the daughter of a colleague of mine, 7-year-old Nadja, who visits our office occasionally. Both girls volunteered to do pictures for me, and, working independently, came up with country scenes dazzled by rainbows.

Both pictures are filled with light and color. The cherry reds, peacock blues, and sunflower yellows do the talking. There are also some other striking colors not usually associated with rainbows that make an unmistakable statement about individuality and creative license.

You can't miss the exhilaration these young artists brought to their work. Their rainbows swoop. Their trees are covered with leaves. Their flowers smile in all weathers. These young girls laugh at parameters. The sky is not the limit. Judy Garland would have been happy among these rainbows.

For me, these pictures capture the Psalmist's delight in the beauty and abundance of God's provision for all of us: "Let the field be joyful, and all that is therein: then shall all the trees of the wood rejoice" (Ps. 96:12). There's a lot of rejoicing in these swathes of color.

When I told Brittany that once in a single day in Wellington, New Zealand, I had seen 13 rainbows, she could scarcely contain her delight. I mentioned that these included some double rainbows, which she felt was fair enough. But she was so thrilled to hear about my experience that she promised that after she'd ridden her new bike, she'd paint me a picture that she'd call "Thirteen rainbows."

Many children have an instinctive appreciation for the spontaneous beauty of rainbows - their surprise value. But they also appreciate rainbows' symbolism and their capacity to make hearts and minds soar.

If a rainbow can appear without warning among clouds after a thunderstorm, why should beautiful healing not be possible after dark clouds of natural disaster or illness have made life feel unbearable? …

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