Wilderness in Bloom ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, December 22, 2005 | Go to article overview

Wilderness in Bloom ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life


One of the things I love about prayer is the way it can bring a new idea zinging into thought. Not just any idea, but one that meets a need. I was a young newlywed when that first happened to me.

One day I opened my thought to God without any agenda. I just wanted to think about God, to hear what He might be saying. Right away the idea came to consider the concept of "wilderness." And though I didn't know where it would lead, I was willing to ponder it.

A wilderness can be an inhospitable, even forbidding, place - barren, dry, lifeless. I asked myself, If I were in an uninhabitable desert place, what would I want to do? Leave! was my first thought. And if I saw no way out? The next idea came quickly: Plant it.

Suddenly this spiritual search had meaning for me.

Just as planting and caring for a wilderness bring transformation, a mental "planting" process could radically change my thought - and, intuition told me, my experience.

The Bible is eloquent about God's promises in wilderness places. For example, "The desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose. It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing" (Isa. 35:1, 2).

As I pondered passages like this, a spiritual sense of beauty filled my heart.

This prayer was like watching a garden come into bloom after a long, cold winter. Qualities such as fullness, color, variety, coolness, and refreshment were "planted" in my consciousness and replaced the desert description I'd been considering.

And there was more to come. After a couple of days, an acquaintance asked if we needed any furniture. In fact, our apartment was extremely bare, containing only a chair, a bed, and a lamp. This new friend told me about someone who was selling all her belongings, and asked if I'd like a preview. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Wilderness in Bloom ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.