Back in Court, Hussein Claims He's the Victim ; Witnesses Described Their Torture after an Assassination Attempt on Iraq's Former Leader

By Ilene R. Prusher writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 22, 2005 | Go to article overview

Back in Court, Hussein Claims He's the Victim ; Witnesses Described Their Torture after an Assassination Attempt on Iraq's Former Leader


Ilene R. Prusher writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


After listening to witness testimony detailing torture and killing that followed a 1982 attempt on his life, Saddam Hussein himself claimed he was a victim of abuse at the hands of his American captors.

The former Iraqi president claimed that he and several other Baath Party officials being tried for crimes against Iraqi civilians are being tortured by the very forces promising to bring rule of law to Iraq.

"Yes, we were beaten by the Americans. And we were tortured - every one of us," said Mr. Hussein, who had been sitting almost placidly for a long afternoon of testimony, avoiding the fiery interruptions and challenges to the court he had made on previous trial dates.

"This one," said Hussein, turning to gesture to one of the defendants behind him, "they hit him on the back with the rifles, until he fell." He then referred to his half-brother, Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti, also a main target of testimony for a trial focused on the killing of more than 140 people from the mainly Shiite village of Dujail. "Barzan, he fell. Both of his feet are showing that [torture]."

US officials in Baghdad and Western legal analysts were quick to suggest that Hussein's allegations were just a gimmick to distract attention from the mountains evidence against him, and to rile his countrymen's resentment toward the US occupation of Iraq.

But Hussein's accusations will most likely need to be answered with an investigation that could slow down the pace of the trial. Such prime-time drama can be expected to play well in Sunni Arab living rooms - where many people are furious over accusations of voter fraud in last week's elections - and with other Iraqis angry over the treatment of detainees in US custody, such as in the Abu Ghraib prisoner-abuse scandal.

Hussein and his lawyers have been trying to recast the former dictator's image to that of an aging, religious man - a kind of honored forefather of the modern Iraqi nation. But the day was filled with testimony that described his regime's brutal torture, horrendous lock-up conditions, and executions of detainees. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Back in Court, Hussein Claims He's the Victim ; Witnesses Described Their Torture after an Assassination Attempt on Iraq's Former Leader
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.