When US Bars Its Door to Foreign Scholars ; A Lawsuit Wants the Bush Administration to Explain Why It Denied Entry to Intellectuals Who've Criticized US Policy

By Alexandra Marks writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

When US Bars Its Door to Foreign Scholars ; A Lawsuit Wants the Bush Administration to Explain Why It Denied Entry to Intellectuals Who've Criticized US Policy


Alexandra Marks writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Concern is mounting that the US government is using antiterror laws - namely, the Patriot Act - to revive a now-discredited practice common during the cold war: the prevention of foreign intellectuals who are critical of administration policies from entering the country and sharing their views with Americans.

The practice, called ideological exclusion, became illegal in 1990. But a recent lawsuit - brought by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the PEN American Center under the Freedom of Information Act - is asking the Bush administration to explain its decisions to revoke or deny visas to several foreign scholars, and why they don't violate free-speech protections.

"This is about free speech, the purpose of colleges and universities," says Donna Euben, counsel for the AAUP in Washington. "We're not challenging the [USA Patriot Act] itself. We're just asking for information about its application to these particular scholars where there is no evidence that they have supported terrorism in any way."

In their suit, the groups cite the cases of several foreign scholars. One, Tariq Ramadan, is a prominent Swiss Muslim scholar who has condemned terrorism and routinely come to the United States on speaking tours in the past. In 2004, as he was preparing to take up a teaching post at the University of Notre Dame, his visa was revoked. The US government gave no formal reason, but press reports suggested the denial was based on "antiterrorism law." Another scholar, Dora Maria Tellez, is a former Nicaraguan government official who more than a decade ago was involved in the overthrow of the US-backed Somoza regime. She had been lined up to teach at Harvard University, but last January her visa was denied.

Administration officials aren't commenting on either case because the matter is now in the courts. But those who support the government's actions say it has a right and a duty to protect national security at a time of war. If it's concerned that a foreign national may promote ideas or activities that are antithetical to US interests, it has every right to deny that individual entry - and without an explanation.

The controversy is the latest illustration of the potential clash between commonly accepted civil rights and governmental efforts to protect national security. At the center of the debate about ideological exclusions is a little known provision of the Patriot Act, called Section 411. It allows the government to refuse admission to foreign nationals who, in the government's view, "have used [their] position of prominence within any country to endorse or espouse terrorist activity, or to persuade others to support terrorist activity or a terrorist organization in a way the Secretary of State has determined undermines United States efforts to reduce or eliminate terrorism. …

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