No Clamor for Xbox in Japan ; Microsoft's Failure to Gauge Cultural Tastes in Pushing Its American Superstar Product Has Resulted in Weak Sales

By Matthew Rusling Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

No Clamor for Xbox in Japan ; Microsoft's Failure to Gauge Cultural Tastes in Pushing Its American Superstar Product Has Resulted in Weak Sales


Matthew Rusling Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


At Osaka's Bic Camera, one of the city's largest electronics superstores, the games department is buzzing with shoppers. But while US stores this holiday season were teeming with gamers clamoring for Microsoft's new Xbox 360, consumers here were ignoring it in favor of the PlayStation 2 (PS2) and Nintendo game aisles.

"I'm not sure whether I will buy Xbox 360 or not, because it has very few games now," says Sagayama Yuichi. Akiyama Yuya simply shrugs his shoulders and says, "PS2 has the games that I want."

Ever since its 2002 release, Microsoft's Xbox has been a colossal sales flop in Japan. The company was hoping for some success with its Xbox 360, released in Japan Dec. 10 - some months ahead of the PlayStation 3 and Nintendo Revolution. But sales numbers indicate that it is even less popular than its predecessor.

While Japanese consumers have been turned off by its lack of games and the clumsy look of its original console, experts say Microsoft's failure to gauge cultural tastes has played a major role in allowing the Japanese market to slip out of its grasp.

"The main problem is that major corporations believe that all problems can be solved with hard work and money. And this is not always the case ... cultural products are very elusive," says Gonzalo Frasca of the IT University of Copenhagen.

Indeed, Microsoft has produced games geared toward Americans, such as the WWII combat simulator Call of Duty II, currently the bestselling Xbox 360 game in the US.

"It caters to a Western audience," says Ben Hourigan, a PhD candidate at Australia's University of Melbourne who is in Japan researching the political aspects of role-playing video games. "The countries that were once the allied powers [such as the US] have a very polarized view of WWII ... 'we were the good guys, they were the bad guys' kind of thing. And that comes out in their video games."

Such games don't appeal to the Japanese, he says. And it's that failure to appeal, experts note, that has led to weak Xbox sales, which in turn discouraged Japanese companies from developing games for it.

Despite America's place as the world's leading pop-culture exporter, no US company manufactured consoles for almost two decades after the market for Atari crashed in 1983-84. …

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