Universal Preschool, Universal Benefits

By The Monitor's View | The Christian Science Monitor, March 27, 2006 | Go to article overview

Universal Preschool, Universal Benefits


The Monitor's View, The Christian Science Monitor


Most parents know intuitively what studies have proven: Children's first years are prime time for learning. Some states are recognizing this and making prekindergarten schooling a top priority. Indeed, "pre-K" should be available to every child because the benefits go far beyond a child's school years.

One far-reaching study, begun in the 1960s, followed a group of low- income children in Michigan from preschool through adulthood. The research, called the High/Scope Perry Preschool Study, showed children who had pre-K education were more likely to graduate from high school, less likely to go on welfare or spend time in jail, and had slightly higher incomes than those who didn't have such a learning advantage.

The benefits of pre-K for children in all income groups is what drives today's supporters. Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich, for instance, wants to include all 3- and 4-year-olds in his pre-K initiative. And this year, Florida will become the third state to offer pre-K to all 4-year-olds.

Such moves build on the success of Head Start, the federally funded, early-learning program begun in the 1960s for families living below the poverty line. In 2005, this program helped more than 900,000 kids get a leg up on language and math skills. A study released last fall of more than 14,000 kindergartners showed that middle-income kids who attend preschool also progress significantly in developing these skills.

Critics fear that the formidable cost of making preschool broadly available isn't worth it. But a key result of preschool is economic gain for all. Higher incomes for those who participated in pre-K, and funds not spent on welfare or prisons, mean there's more money in the economy. …

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