Turkish Writers Take Stand for Free Speech ; Five Prominent Journalists Go to Court Tuesday, Weeks after Similar Charges Were Dropped against Novelist Orhan Pamuk

By Yigal Schleifer Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 7, 2006 | Go to article overview

Turkish Writers Take Stand for Free Speech ; Five Prominent Journalists Go to Court Tuesday, Weeks after Similar Charges Were Dropped against Novelist Orhan Pamuk


Yigal Schleifer Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Twenty-something Fatih Tas is far from being one of the giants of the Turkish publishing scene. Based in a poorly heated one-room office, his Istanbul-based Aram publishing house usually counts its sales of individual titles in the hundreds - maybe the thousands if business is good.

But Aram's small size hasn't kept it from drawing the attention of the Turkish authorities. Mr. Tas currently has 20 court cases open against him and faces a six-month prison sentence if his appeal is not upheld. His fault? Violating a vaguely-worded law that regulates a wide range of acts that could be interpreted as an "insult" to "Turkish identity" or to the country's military and other state institutions.

World-renowned Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk was charged under the same law after he told a Swiss magazine in an interview last year that 1 million Armenians and 30,000 Kurds were killed in Turkey in the past century. But unlike Pamuk, whose case was dropped on a technicality under strong pressure from the European Union, Tas and dozens of others are still mired in a legal system that raises questions about Turkey's readiness to join the EU.

"This resolution of the Pamuk drama does not really bring a lot of resolution to the other cases, because nobody really stood up for freedom of expression," says an Ankara-based European diplomat, who asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the subject.

"Nothing of what was used to end the Pamuk case could be used to resolve some of these lesser-known cases," the diplomat added. Freedom of expression activists estimate that there are perhaps 80 ongoing cases in Turkey relating to the law - article 301 of Turkey's new penal code - or other similar statutes.

Five prominent Turkish journalists are expected in an Istanbul court Tuesday to face charges stemming from columns they wrote criticizing a judge's decision last September to ban an academic conference about the Armenian question.

Turkish legal experts say the cases represent a clash between pro- EU forces and conservative, nationalist members of the judiciary and government who are trying to use laws like Article 301 to slow down Turkey's democratic reform process. …

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