A Dialogue in Art between Two Cities ; in the Late 19th Century, the Exchange of Artistic Ideas between Paris and London Bore Exceptional Fruit

By Stephen, Katherine | The Christian Science Monitor, March 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

A Dialogue in Art between Two Cities ; in the Late 19th Century, the Exchange of Artistic Ideas between Paris and London Bore Exceptional Fruit


Stephen, Katherine, The Christian Science Monitor


At the end of the Victorian age, London was the very definition of the metropolis, teeming with commercial momentum and the fervor of lives caught up in the wheels of progress.

Across the English Channel, Paris was only half the size of the British capital, a jewel of aesthetic refinements that the Victorian British often regarded with a mixture of disapproval and awe.

History shows that the relationship between the two capitals has always been complex. But between 1870 and 1910, the exchange of artistic ideas between the two societies bore exceptional fruit, especially for the development of Walter Sickert, whose oeuvre reveals the vast extent of the influence of his chosen mentor, the French master Edgar Degas.

A multifaceted exhibition at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., traces the pattern of mutual influence between Paris and London for artists of this era. "Degas, Sickert, and Toulouse-Lautrec: London and Paris 1870-1910" displays almost 100 works by these three major artists, plus many others. Paintings by James McNeill Whistler, Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard, Philip Wilson Steer, James Tissot, and others reveal the complex web of cross-cultural artistic dialogue that characterized this age when national boundaries began to melt in the pursuit of new art.

Perhaps the single most profound result of this dialogue was the soulful art of the British painter Walter Richard Sickert (1860- 1942). Not particularly well known outside Britain, Sickert's paintings of London scenes reveal "deep analysis of symbolism and the surface appearance of the world," according to critic David Peters Corbett.

Sickert once said: "The most fruitful course of study lies in the persistent effort to render the magic and poetry of London." He was, however, innately cosmopolitan in his approach to life, and thus open to aesthetic currents emanating from France. Born in Munich, the son of a Danish painter, he and his family moved to England when he was 8.

In 1883, when he was an apprentice to James Whistler, he was sent on an errand to Paris with a letter of introduction to Edgar Degas. Degas was gaining notice in France as an innovative Impressionist with a realist tendency. His pictures of modern Parisian life were arresting in composition and new in perspective.

Sickert arrived in Paris at a time when he was ready for a new view of art beyond the approach of Whistler, whose goal was always aesthetic harmony. Pictured here, and included in this exhibition, is "Harmony in Grey and Green: Miss Cicely Alexander, 1872-74" by Whistler. …

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