Security Fears Stunt Online Bank Growth

By Regan, Tom | The Christian Science Monitor, May 31, 2006 | Go to article overview

Security Fears Stunt Online Bank Growth


Regan, Tom, The Christian Science Monitor


I first discovered the joys of online banking in the late 1990s. I was living in Canada, but working for the Monitor in Boston. All my paychecks were being deposited in my Cambridge, Mass., bank account. By using Internet banking, I could pay my bills in the United States and transfer money to my Canadian accounts. I was sure that in a few years, everyone would bank online.

We aren't there yet. Still, about 42 percent of Americans now bank online, often via a website offered by their regular "brick and mortar" bank, according to a survey by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. Of all the Internet activities Pew has studied since its inaugural survey in March of 2000, Internet banking has grown the fastest.

But Americans' interest in online banking may be waning, The number of people banking online is expected to grow by just 4 percent between 2006 and 2010, according to Lisa Phillips, senior researcher at eMarketer, a market research firm in New York.

Why would consumers move away from banking online?

Basically, concerns about security. People still do many things online that don't make a lot of sense - open e-mails with suspicious attachments, give away information to shifty e-mail marketers, forget to log off their machines when they leave a public Internet terminal. But when it comes to their money, most folks display a heightened awareness that seems missing at other times.

In a 2005 survey of 1,000 American adults conducted by the global market research firm Ipsos Insight, 72 percent said they were worried about banks selling their information to a third party, while 73 percent said they had concerns about identity theft. People wanted banks to provide greater assurances about protections in these areas and make it easier to actually contact a "real person" when they needed help.

It's easy to see why people have security concerns. Most probably receive several "phishing" e-mails a day from crooks trying to get them to hand over their banking, credit-card, or other personal information. Recent events, such as the theft of personal data from about 26.5 million vets from the Department of Veterans Affairs, may not affect everyone directly, but it makes us nervous. Even commercials about identity theft, aimed at reassuring people that they are protected, probably move some people toward not doing any online banking at all.

Some analysts forecast that one type of online banking will grow more rapidly in the years ahead. "Virtual banks," with no brick-and- mortar components, account for only about 2 percent of all deposits made in the US, according to The Online Banking Report, an independent newsletter that has reported on the subject since 1995. …

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