In War-Torn Sudan, Women Wage Peace ; Recent Conferences Highlight Growing Efforts to Include Women in the Struggle to End Brutal Conflicts

By Rob Crilly Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

In War-Torn Sudan, Women Wage Peace ; Recent Conferences Highlight Growing Efforts to Include Women in the Struggle to End Brutal Conflicts


Rob Crilly Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


When the farming tribes of Darfur took up arms more than two years ago against what they saw as a neglectful Arab-dominated government, Samia Ahmed Nihar's brothers, uncles, and male cousins joined the struggle.

But as a lecturer in development studies at Khartoum University in Sudan's capital, Ms. Nihar, a mother of two, took on a different role.

With the government's media machine and its compliant local charities refusing to acknowledge the horrors of Darfur, Ms. Nihar became a secret conduit to ensure that the real story made its way to international journalists and charities in Khartoum. A member of the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA) rebel group, she risked imprisonment or worse to make sure that the truth of the Arab janjaweed militia and government attacks on civilian villages became known.

"We as women were involved in trying to liaise with NGOs here in Khartoum, keeping them in touch with what was going on there and reflecting the bad situation of women in Darfur," says Nihar, who was in good company at a recent four-day workshop in Khartoum organized by the US-based Initiative for Inclusive Security, a program to involve women in peace processes around the world.

The conference was designed to include women's voices in bringing peace to Darfur, and in efforts to rebuild Southern Sudan - itself the scene of a separate civil war that ended last year.

The challenges the women face are huge, and the Nov. 9-12 conference is something of a milestone in a country dominated by Islamists where few women hold positions of real power. Conference organizers say women are too often excluded from peace and reconstruction talks in favor of men with guns. When peace negotiations focus on the combatants, the real victims often find themselves voiceless and disenfranchised.

"Our rationale for working around the world - and our rationale for working with Sudanese women - is that we believe peace will be more durable if women are included," says Carla Koppell, director of the Initiative for Inclusive Security. "Often you see peace processes that only bring together those that bore arms. It seems to us illogical and not efficacious to not bring in the stakeholders for peace, which very often are women."

Risky business

But it has been very difficult - and dangerous - for Sudanese women to take a stand for peace. "We were frightened all the time. We were scared that we could be arrested or even our families would have problems, because of what we were doing," Nihar says of her surreptitious efforts to raise awareness of the atrocities in Darfur. …

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