The Melting-Pot Metaphor

By Walker, Ruth | The Christian Science Monitor, November 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

The Melting-Pot Metaphor


Walker, Ruth, The Christian Science Monitor


The melting pot has been around for quite a while as a way to describe a certain American ideal - "Give us your tired, your poor" - your immigrants from wherever, and we'll turn them into Americans. That was the idea behind that broad paraphrase of Emma Lazarus by way of Fiorello LaGuardia, with some Jane Addams and Eleanor Roosevelt thrown in.

More recently, this ideal has been called into question. Is it a good thing for newcomers to America to give up their ancestral languages, their perhaps richer traditions of extended family life, or their more interesting food to become, in effect, pretend Anglos?

"No" is the answer from some quarters. A cultural-sensitivity coach in San Francisco sums up a new attitude thus:

"Today the trend is toward multiculturalism, not assimilation. The old 'melting pot' metaphor is giving way to new metaphors such as 'salad bowl' and 'mosaic,' mixtures of various ingredients that keep their individual characteristics. Immigrant populations within the United States are not being blended together in one 'pot,' but rather they are transforming American society into a truly multicultural mosaic."

The first time I can remember hearing the term "multicultural" was in Australia in 1984, where I reported on an extensive "multicultural television" operation based in Sydney. Reviewing the piece now, I see that I did indeed use the phrase melting pot - as a culinary metaphor.

But was I right? There are relatively few ingredients that one melts in the kitchen - butter, fat, chocolate, perhaps cheese. One doesn't, in any cuisine I'm aware of, melt whole assemblages of ingredients into a single dish.

Soupmaking may be a good source of metaphors for different approaches to assimilation or multiculturalism. Some soups are homogenized through a blender - get it? In other soups, the constituent elements remain distinct. My mother used to make what she called a vegetable soup with chunks of beef big enough that we ate it with knife and fork. …

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