Riots in Bangladesh May Benefit Islamists ; as Bangladesh's Two Main Political Parties Fought in the Streets This Weekend, Radical Groups Are Making Inroads

By David Montero Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Riots in Bangladesh May Benefit Islamists ; as Bangladesh's Two Main Political Parties Fought in the Streets This Weekend, Radical Groups Are Making Inroads


David Montero Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A hail of bullets and rocks swept over Bangladesh's cities this past weekend, spawning a deadly political crisis that threatens upcoming elections in January. Although averted for now, as of Sunday night, there are still pitfalls that may prove a boon for the country's Islamist parties, observers say.

On Friday, the ruling Bangladesh National Party (BNP), which took office in 2001 in a coalition with Islamist parties, officially ended its five-year term. Bangladesh's Constitution stipulates that a transitional, nonparty caretaker government must assume the reins to help steer the country toward elections in January.

For several days this weekend, political leaders from the ruling BNP and the opposition Awami League bickered over who would head the interim government. Meanwhile, party activists sparred in violent clashes that left 18 dead and hundreds wounded. But on Sunday evening the current president, Iajuddin Ahmed, was sworn in as the head of the interim administration.

For now a crisis seems to have been avoided, but observers cautioned against jumping to optimistic conclusions. The days leading to January's elections may be fraught with violence that could benefit Islamist parties in the world's third largest Muslim country.

So continues a longstanding tradition of political violence in Bangladesh. It is a crisis the country can ill afford, given the disturbing expansion in recent years of Islamist political power and a culture of intolerance.

"The violence we see on the streets of Bangladesh is basically creating space for the extremists to exploit," says Samina Ahmed, South Asia project director of the International Crisis Group. "They might have sworn in the president, but we have to wait and see how the opposition will react to this." Ms. Ahmed adds that lingering disagreements about the elections could spark further violence between the two parties.

Bangladesh remains a moderate Muslim democracy, though political frustration is at an all time high in the country - one of the world's poorest and most densely populated nations. The country's inherently liberal traditions have always acted as a bulwark against strict interpretations of Islam.

But in a story that has been repeated from the West Bank to Somalia, Islamist groups like Jamaat-e-Islami, Bangladesh's largest religious party, have stepped in where the government has failed, providing basic services such as water and sanitation to millions of citizens who would otherwise be ignored.

Moments of reconciliation are rare and usually fleeting in Bangladesh's long history of political violence. The country was originally born out of bloodshed when it fought for independence from Pakistan in 1971. Ever since, a bitter rivalry between the country's main political parties, the BNP and the Awami League, has arrested the political landscape and spawned a culture of conflict.

But the rise of Islamist politics and extremism is a relatively new and disturbing chapter in the country's political evolution - one that highlights just how much the democratic parties have, through their rivalry, ground the democratic process to a halt. …

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