Toxic Seed Becomes Hope for the Hungry ; Scientists Reengineer Cottonseed. Now, They Aim to Turn More Poisonous Plants into Human Food

By Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 27, 2006 | Go to article overview

Toxic Seed Becomes Hope for the Hungry ; Scientists Reengineer Cottonseed. Now, They Aim to Turn More Poisonous Plants into Human Food


Peter N. Spotts writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Where most people might look at a white-capped cotton plant and see the makings of next year's T-shirts, Keerti Rathore sees food for a hungry world.

Dr. Rathore and his colleagues have figured out how to make poisonous cottonseeds fit for human consumption. The new, nontoxic seeds could give 500 million people an additional source of high- quality protein, the team estimates, if the genetically engineered plant is approved for cultivation.

In principle, this approach could expand the array of plants or plant parts humans could eat without heavy processing or precooking preparation. Rathore's team virtually shuts off the gene responsible for the toxin. The researchers don't replace the gene or add one to get the desired trait. Thus, some researchers suggest, the technique might be more politically palatable to people who oppose genetically modified crops.

"This is a nice piece of work," says Steve Scofield, a molecular biologist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Still, he cautions, "the biggest issue they've got is that this will be viewed as a [genetically modified] plant. So there may be a public- acceptance issue."

Crop scientists have been exploring the approach, known as RNA interference, to reduce or eliminate compounds they have tied to allergic reactions to foods.

Coming up with a toxin-free cottonseed "is not that straightforward," says Rathore, who heads the Laboratory for Crop Transformation at Texas A&M University. His team's results are reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Scientists have pursued the goal for 50 years. Cotton is grown worldwide, and for every two pounds of fiber, a cotton field also yields slightly more than three and a half pounds of seed - totaling some 44 million tons a year.

Cottonseed is the third-largest oil-seed crop in the world, according to the US Department of Agriculture. But its oil requires heavy processing for use in cooking. And the raw seeds are fit to feed only livestock such as cows.

In the 1950s scientists stumbled onto a variety of cotton that didn't have the toxin and bred it with commercial varieties.

"The seeds were good enough to eat," Rathore says. But without the toxin, known as gossypol, the plant cannot defend itself against pests and pathogens.

Thus, for Rathore and colleagues at the USDA's Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center, gossypol became a prime target for RNA silencing - a technique for switching genes off that earned two US scientists a Nobel Prize this year. …

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