Peace Management ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, March 19, 2007 | Go to article overview

Peace Management ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life


I once worked for a corporation that was made up of a dozen smaller but individually successful companies. The owner of the parent company had promised each branch it would be permitted to continue its moneymaking ways.

At first it seemed like a good idea, but the branches were all former competitors. The managers of those branches were barely on speaking terms. Having the same corporate name and mission statement did not reconcile their differences.

Then a technology shift occurred in the industry, and it was suddenly essential that all branch companies work toward the same goal of understanding the problem and implementing a shared solution.

I was asked to chair a panel, made up of mid-level technology managers, that would begin this process. Consulting my branch manager, I found he provided little guidance because his area of expertise was competition, not cooperation.

On the way to that first meeting, a three-hour drive, I prayed constantly. I realized that only one infinite Mind, God, has the necessary answers. I also recalled something that Mary Baker Eddy wrote in her book "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures": "Mortals are egotists. They believe themselves to be independent workers, personal authors, and even privileged originators of something which Deity would not or could not create. The creations of mortal mind are material. Immortal spiritual man alone represents the truth of creation" (p. 263).

I didn't dare walk into that series of meetings as an egotist or a "creator." I simply looked around the table and saw 12 complete, distinct, eager creations of God.

As such, we found it exceedingly easy to communicate and to bolster one another's efforts. …

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Peace Management ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
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