Facing My Immortality

The Christian Science Monitor, January 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Facing My Immortality


My mother lived in a care facility. She was older than most of the other residents of advanced years, and as I visited her every day, my goal was to gain a better understanding of her true being as a loved and undying expression of her Maker.

As you might imagine, immortality isn't the first thought that comes to mind to anyone who enters such a facility. But it came to be a very needed and important focus for me. As I strove to understand more of my mother's and my immortality, to see through the veil of impending death to a higher concept of life, I found my thought opening to immortal life as the natural, eternal state of each of us.

There's authority for this conviction in the Bible and in the writings of Mary Baker Eddy, whose Bible-based works offer hope and healing. These writings, which include the Christian Science textbook, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," are for all interested in seeing God's presence made practical in their lives.

To see ourselves in spiritual terms so we can better perceive God's presence can be done by rejecting thoughts that suggest our identity is chained to matter, subject to its vagaries, or that any one of us can be less than what we were created to be. This involves a moment-by-moment surrendering of each thought that even hints at limitations, and accepting the realness of God.

For me, this yielding takes place as I read statements such as this one from Science and Health: "As a material, theoretical life- basis is found to be a misapprehension of existence, the spiritual and divine Principle of man dawns upon human thought, and leads it to 'where the young child was,' - even to the birth of a new-old idea, to the spiritual sense of being and of what Life includes" (p. 191).

As God's expression, we have the spiritual authority and stature to stand up to whatever would make us feel that we can't know God as the source of our being. When I take this stand, I'm exercising the dominion that the first chapter of Genesis tells us God gave man, as His image and likeness. …

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