Freedom from Flu

The Christian Science Monitor, March 5, 2008 | Go to article overview

Freedom from Flu


The flu has come to New England and the rest of the country, and a great effort is being made to care for the patients who have flooded doctor's offices and clinics. The efficacy of this year's vaccine has been questioned. But there is another care system that can lead to freedom from flu: prayer.

Gaining a more spiritual perspective on health gives us confidence in God's continuous care and protection. Through understanding the connection between our thinking and our health - how our thoughts govern our bodies - sick or fearful thoughts can be eradicated through God's loving power, and that heals.

How does this work? We can begin with God who created each of us. He made us in His image and likeness, which means that our true nature is spiritual and good (see Gen. 1:26, 27). As God's offspring, each of us reflects God's dominion, harmony, joy, love, peace, and freedom. Our health or harmony is established by God because it's part of being God's image and likeness.

Mary Baker Eddy, who discovered Christian Science, wrote: "Health is not a condition of matter, but of Mind ..." ("Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," p. 120). Because we are God's children, we can listen to thoughts that come from God - peaceful, loving, spiritual, light-filled, pure, humble thoughts - and lead to health. And we can reject thoughts of fear, hatred, revenge, and willfulness that often lead to inharmony or disease. Fearful thoughts belong to the carnal mind, a mind opposed to God, which the Bible says is "enmity against God" (Rom. 8:7).

Jesus never viewed sickness as something that needed to be accepted or tolerated. His certainty of God's love for man - including both men and women - was so firm that he could heal even long-term illnesses instantly. Jesus taught that the kingdom of God is within each one of us and is peaceful and harmonious (see Luke 17:21).

One time Jesus was visiting Peter's home, and his mother-in-law was in bed with a fever. …

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