Progress - a Divine Right

The Christian Science Monitor, September 3, 2008 | Go to article overview

Progress - a Divine Right


Ever tried to switch from using a nickname to using your full name? It's easier said than done. Remembering how to introduce yourself is hard enough; getting other people to think of you differently is even harder. And that's just a name change!

Imagine effecting a more substantial makeover - a change in attitude, disposition, or character. The prospect can feel almost too hard to tackle, even if the change is a much-desired step of progress. But approaching self-improvement from a spiritual perspective makes progress go more smoothly. Gaining a better understanding of the spiritual nature of creation is a good place to begin.

In her primary work, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," Mary Baker Eddy, the Monitor's founder, explained the spiritual nature of creation. She wrote, "Infinite Mind creates and governs all, from the mental molecule to infinity" (p. 507). If infinite Mind is the Creator, creation must be mental, and it can never end because the infinite has no limits, no start or finish. Mrs. Eddy put it this way: "Creation is ever appearing, and must ever continue to appear from the nature of its inexhaustible source" (p. 507).

This eternal unfolding is possible because creation is spiritual, not material. Infinite Mind creates ideas, not things. Each of us is actually a perfect, spiritual idea, created and governed by divine Mind.

If a job, living situation, or relationship feels stagnant or stifling, that's a sure sign we need to see it - ourselves and everyone involved - as God's perfect spiritual creation. Divine ideas never languish or get stuck. Joy, peace, love, integrity, freedom, and beauty can't be cut off or confined.

The more we identify ourselves and others in terms of the spiritual ideas that constitute our true identity, the more we'll find ourselves expressing and experiencing them. …

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