Everhouse: A New Plan for Post-Katrina Homes

By Contributor, Paul Sedan | The Christian Science Monitor, October 24, 2008 | Go to article overview

Everhouse: A New Plan for Post-Katrina Homes


Contributor, Paul Sedan, The Christian Science Monitor


John Sawyer's vision for the next phase of Katrina recovery revolves around a simple home.

Three years after hurricanes Katrina and Rita battered the Gulf Coast, housing remains a major problem in the region. There's a shortage of skilled labor to build new homes, insurance rates have skyrocketed, and most federal aid for temporary housing expired this year.

Mr. Sawyer's response: the Everhouse, a single-family home built from concrete wall panels that are wind-, fire-, mold-, and pest- resistant. About $68 per square foot, the Everhouse is about half the cost of affordable housing in some Gulf Coast cities.

Sawyer is a Boston-based builder who's used to working on golf- course communities and retirement homes. But when he and his partner, Harold McKenna, visited the Gulf Coast area after the storms, they started brainstorming a housing solution that could improve on the recent "Katrina cottages."

Step 1: Who will build them?

"We readily saw that there is an acute shortage of skilled construction labor in the area," says Sawyer. "And when you consider the scope of the problem - 700,000 homes damaged [by the hurricanes] and 250,000 homes destroyed - you realize that you're going to have to create your own labor force if you're going to be at all successful."

But there's a two-prong problem. Without many local skilled workers, they'd need to both find new people and then train them. So, the duo teamed up with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners (UBC), an organization of 500,000 tradespeople and one of the biggest publishers of how-to training manuals.

The carpentry union runs 250 national training centers, says Dan Maples, the brotherhood's vice president of the Southern District, including one center in Moss Point, Miss., near where Sawyer and Mr. McKenna want to build the first 1,500 Everhouses. There, the trainers will sign up and educate whomever in the area is ready to work. Sawyer's team will pay the new recruits union wages and the workers have the opportunity to buy and live in the houses once they're done.

"We hope to create a crew that will become skilled at all the trades necessary for completion of the house," says Mr. Maples. "Then they can use those skills to build other homes and go on to become a viable workforce for home building and commercial structures in the Gulf Coast area."

Step 2: How to build?

With deals in place to train a new workforce, Sawyer moved on to planning a timetable for construction.

He wanted to emulate the Scandinavian factory-crafted model, where a united group tackles the whole project instead of the subcontractor method typical in American construction, where individual tasks are outsourced to several distinct groups. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Everhouse: A New Plan for Post-Katrina Homes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.