A Short Course in Coping with Long Sleeves

By Suzanne S. Brown Scripps Howard News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 19, 1993 | Go to article overview

A Short Course in Coping with Long Sleeves


Suzanne S. Brown Scripps Howard News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


THIS IS THE year to have a few tricks on your sleeve.

Big cuffs are back on shirts, in poetic, belled styles or crisply tailored versions borrowed from the boys. But be warned: It's going to be tough to keep from dragging these voluminous folds of fabric through your dinner plate.

Clever cuff treatments fit in with the romantic aesthetic now in favor. A generous sweep of fabric peeking from the sleeve of a brocade jacket is just the dandified touch that makes an outfit look old-fashioned and modern all at once.

French cuffs are another option. To be cutting-edge chic, you wear the shirt sans cuff links. But once at the office, you'd be wise to roll up your sleeves, or at least whip out the links before tackling a desk full of paperwork.

What's also interesting about cuffed blouses is that they are showing up in just about every price range.

"The range goes from a $30 rayon poet's blouse with a double row of ruffles, which you can find in the juniors or moderate blouse department, to a $300 silk georgette number from Ellen Tracy," says Hope Brick, vice president for fashion merchandising at Foley's, a department store.

Most honest fashion types admit that while the style is beautiful, it also was better suited to an earlier, more graceful era. …

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