At the Moment, Faulk Talk Doesn't Include Heisman

By 1993, Scripps Howard News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 19, 1993 | Go to article overview

At the Moment, Faulk Talk Doesn't Include Heisman


1993, Scripps Howard News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


He is a nice, well-adjusted, impressive young man, a made-for-the-movies success story.

He has catapulted himself from an impoverished and violence-riddled childhood in a New Orleans housing project to nationwide college football fame.

But there is a problem with Marshall Faulk: He was too good too early. He led the nation in rushing as a freshman. He led the nation in rushing as a sophomore. He made runs that made the hair on your neck stand up.

Now he is a junior. His team is not playing well. He is not putting up the numbers expected of him. He has become an early also-ran in the minds of Heisman Trophy voters.

He is still polite, but he doesn't want to talk much now. He doesn't want to talk because everybody wants to know the same things: What's wrong? And can you still win the Heisman Trophy?

"There are more important things going on with our team than the Heisman," Faulk said during his weekly news conference.

He sounded weary. He has rushed for 234 yards on 49 carries in San Diego State's first two games. People want more. He averaged 6.2 yards per carry last season. This season, it's 4.8.

Faulk was hardly illuminating during his news conference, but he is quite capable of interesting conversation. He proved that in late July when he came to Denver for the Western Athletic Conference football media kickoff.

Faulk attempted to shed light on the phenomenon he has become. Here are excerpts from that conversation.

Q: Should you have won the Heisman last year?

A: I don't think I was outplayed enough not to win the Heisman. It broke down to a No. 1 team against a non-ranked team. So it's hard to give me the Heisman because what did I do? All the records are nice, but Gino (Torretta) and Miami were No. 1.

Q: Is the Heisman really important to you?

A: I think about it, but I won't die if I don't win it. My heart won't stop beating if I don't win it this year.

Q: Injuries bothered you the past two years. What would it be like to have a season that's injury-free?

A: If I have one, I'll let you know. There isn't much I can do. The type of injuries I have, stretching and calisthenics and all that stuff won't help. When I get injured, I get injured big. I don't get the little nagging stuff. I get broken ribs with a collapsed lung.

Q: Do you think people think you're getting paid?

A: There's been speculation about that ever since I got to San Diego State. …

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