CBS Says Goodbye to Baseball

By Jim Gaffney Tribune Media Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 17, 1993 | Go to article overview

CBS Says Goodbye to Baseball


Jim Gaffney Tribune Media Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


FROM pennant races in every division to outstanding individual performances, baseball in 1993 had something for everybody:

John Olerud flirted with .400. Dave Winfield got his 3,000th career hit. Jim Abbott threw a no-hitter. Nolan Ryan and George Brett said goodbye. The Rockies broke attendance records in Denver. The Braves and Giants went the distance in the NL West. The Mets went under in the NL East.

Great stories were everywhere.

"It's been a remarkable season," agrees CBS analyst Tim McCarver.

On Sunday (7 p.m. on Channel 4), McCarver and broadcast partner Sean McDonough will be in the home park of the American League champion for Game 2 of the 1993 World Series, which continues all this week. First pitch is set for shortly before 7:30.

A former catcher who played in three World Series for the Cardinals during a 22-year major-league career, McCarver will be broadcasting his fourth - and last - series for CBS. The network's $1 billion TV contract, a huge money-loser throughout its four-year run, ends after this season.

"It was unfortunate that in the first year of the CBS deal, with everybody talking about how much money we were losing, that the World Series would be over in four games," comments McCarver. "Sure, that's disheartening, but you also understand that you have no control over it."

CBS and McCarver got luckier in 1991, with a great seven-game Series between the Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves. "Some people say it was the most exciting World Series ever played," McCarver reflects. "I agree that it ranks right up there."

Another seven-game series would be a welcome end to the national pastime's stay at CBS. The network would love it, the fans would love it, and McCarver - would love it.

"In a long series, it's the players who take over the broadcast," he says. "All of a sudden, we are no longer setting up the action. Instead, we're watching and enjoying the games along with the fans."

Asked to name the best moment from his time at CBS, McCarver doesn't hesitate:

"Sid Bream of the Braves scoring the winning run in game seven of last year's NL playoffs was one of most dramatic things ever to happen in postseason play. That, without a doubt, is the highlight."

Off the field, McCarver has nothing but praise for the job the network did during a sometimes-difficult four years.

"My time here has been terrific," he says. "To see so many people work so hard to get the production up to such a professional level has been great. We - had some problems early, but none that weren't solvable."

When the series ends, McCarver will likely get offers to work on next season's ABC/NBC baseball package, a six-year deal that cuts down regular-season TV games while adding an extra round of playoffs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

CBS Says Goodbye to Baseball
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.