And in This Corner. the Garden's Peter Raven Squares off with Business Professor Julian Simon over Species Extinction

By William Allen Post-Dispatch Science | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 1, 1993 | Go to article overview

And in This Corner. the Garden's Peter Raven Squares off with Business Professor Julian Simon over Species Extinction


William Allen Post-Dispatch Science, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


ST. LOUIS may never be the scene of a boxing match on the order of Evander Holyfield vs. Riddick Bowe or Joe Frazier vs. Muhammad Ali.

But an equally intense flurry of verbal punches on one of the heavyweight issues of our time is slated to fly Tuesday afternoon at the Ritz-Carlton in Clayton. Two of the nation's most prominent arch rivals will square off on the issue of "Species Extinction: Is There a Crisis?"

Climbing into the debate ring will be biologist and hometown favorite Peter Raven, director of the Missouri Botanical Garden. His opponent: conservative naysayer Julian Simon, professor of business administration at the University of Maryland at College Park.

More than 100 science writers from around the country will have ringside seats to watch the thrust and parry of two great debaters. They are in town for the 31st New Horizons in Science briefing, which runs through Thursday. It is open only to journalists.

The briefing is organized by the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing, a science journalism group that holds the fall briefing in a different city each year. This year's briefing is sponsored by Washington University, with support from Monsanto Co. and the National Science Foundation.

The CASW card features a dozen reports by researchers on the frontiers of science and technology. Among these reports will be new findings on organ farming for transplant surgery, an oral anti-fertility vaccine and a hazardous waste cleanup technique called "the Lasagna Project."

The Raven vs. Simon bout is shaping up as the main event. It should capture attention no matter what you feel about the state of the Earth.

The debate will provide "an incredible tension and atmosphere very rare at science meetings," said Tony Fitzpatrick, senior science editor at Washington University and longtime attendee at the annual briefings. "Both men represent two starkly contrasting ideologies, and they're outstanding speakers."

Simon, who has a reputation as a caustic debater, and Raven, known for rapid-fire recitation of statistics, have debated twice in the past, and you can hear in their voices that there is bad blood between them.

In a recent telephone interview, Simon said the real reason he is taking to the ring again is to tell the science writers about Monte Carlo methods, a statistical technique. But he will pull no punches on species extinction, he said.

"My message on that is a very simple one: There is no evidence for species extinction beyond the one a year that has been going on for the past 80 years," Simon said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

And in This Corner. the Garden's Peter Raven Squares off with Business Professor Julian Simon over Species Extinction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.