Hungary Gets Migs from Russia to Pay Trade Debt

By 1993, Los Angeles Times | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 8, 1993 | Go to article overview

Hungary Gets Migs from Russia to Pay Trade Debt


1993, Los Angeles Times, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


In partial settlement of its Communist-era trade debt to Hungary, Russia has deeded over 28 state-of-the-art MiG-29 fighter jets - 26 more than the number of Hungarian pilots who know how to fly them.

Even after the Russians train their allies to use the high-tech trade goods, the planes are unlikely to get much exercise at top speed. Hungary's small territory can be overflown by the supersonic jets in minutes, posing the risk of provocative intrusions into bordering airspace.

The acquisition, which has ruffled some neighboring countries, reflects the insecurity felt by Hungarians who find themselves poorly defended and surrounded by post-Cold War turmoil.

Serbs, Croats and Muslim Slavs are at war in the wreckage of the former Yugoslav federation to the south, and Budapest's relations with Romania and Slovakia are strained by persistent disputes over the treatment of Hungarian minorities in those countries. There is also concern in Hungary over the potential for conflict between Russia and Ukraine, which also sits on Hungary's volatile border.

"This whole region of Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans and the former Soviet Union is a powder keg," said Lt. Col. Lajos Erdelyi, spokesman for the Defense Ministry, explaining the government decision to acquire the new MiGs. "We don't feel Hungary is threatened by any one nation. It's just in a bad neighborhood. …

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