Dagwood Gets an Italian Accent

By Simmons, Marie | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 3, 1994 | Go to article overview

Dagwood Gets an Italian Accent


Simmons, Marie, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


SOMETIMES A sandwich is just right for supper. My sandwich creations are much more than a few slices of cold cuts slapped between slices of bread. First I design the sandwich, and then I build it. I like a sandwich of substance. Something I can sink my teeth into and taste in layers, like the following recipe for a club sandwich that I have re-christened the Dagwood Italiano.

The bread - of utmost importance - is purchased at the deli department in my supermarket. It comes pre-sliced and is not the authentic crisp-outside-soft-inside Italian bread I like for other occasions. This bread has a soft, but sturdy crumb and crust - perfect for a sandwich.

For dessert, serve store-bought brownies or make a batch of chocolate-frosted chocolate espresso bars. They are sensational.

***** DAGWOOD ITALIANO

8 halves dried tomatoes

1 cup boiling water

2 medium zucchini, washed, trimmed

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided

1 clove garlic, crushed, divided

1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, stripped from stems, or dash dried, divided

1 teaspoon fresh oregano leaves, stripped from stems, or dash dried, divided

Salt

Freshly ground black pepper

4 chicken or turkey cutlets (about 12 ounces total, flattened with mallet, if necessary)

1 (7 1/2-ounce) jar roasted red peppers

8 whole fresh basil leaves, optional

12 slices deli-style Italian loaf bread, with or without seeds

Place tomatoes in small bowl; add boiling water. Cover; let stand 20 minutes or until softened. Drain and pat dry with paper towels. Reserve.

Cut zucchini into 16 ( 1/4-inch-thick) diagonal slices. Place in medium bowl. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil, half the crushed garlic, half the thyme and oregano, dash of salt and grinding of black pepper. Toss to coat.

Combine remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, garlic, thyme and oregano on large plate. Add cutlets; turn to coat. Season with salt and grinding of pepper. Let stand until ready to prepare.

Drain roasted peppers in strainer. Rinse thoroughly with cold water; pat dry with paper towel. Reserve.

Heat large nonstick griddle or skillet over high heat until hot enough to evaporate 1 drop of water upon contact. Add zucchini; cook 3 to 4 minutes per side or until lightly browned. …

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