Rights and Values in Missouri Sexual Behavior Should Not Be Basis for Special Legal Protection

By Summers, Paul | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

Rights and Values in Missouri Sexual Behavior Should Not Be Basis for Special Legal Protection


Summers, Paul, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Wow, what a job! No sooner did we finish one major task (defeating the "mini-gay rights" bill in Springfield, Mo., 71 percent to 29 percent than we were asked to take on an even larger one, the Amendment Coalition's effort to place a Missouri constitutional amendment on the November ballot. The hope is that the fiasco suffered by the people of Springfield will not be necessary around the state.

Who are the people who call themselves the Amendment Coalition? The coalition is a group of pro-family leaders from around the state who have been involved in other pro-family organizations and issues.

They are people who have become alarmed at the encroachment of homosexual, lesbian and bisexual demands on society for tolerance, recognition, acceptance, legitimization and now special protection, rights and privileges for their so-called lifestyle at the expense of our country's traditional Judeo-Christian family values, the source of this country's greatness. As the Frenchman said, "America is great because America is good. . . . When she ceases to be good, she will cease to be great." As someone with typical Ozark wisdom put it, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

This country is only as strong as the family unit. The Amendment Coalition is trying to preserve and protect our families from those who would redefine the family unit to include same-sex marriages, homosexual adoption of children and other distortions of what traditional family values are all about.

Our proposed amendment is intended to limit homosexual, lesbian and bisexual rights and privileges to no more than those enjoyed by the general population. That is, we contend that sexual behavior should not be the basis for special rights, recognition or privileges under the law. The government has no business placing its stamp of approval on a behavioral based lifestyle.

So what's the problem? Is there cause for concern? To find the answer, one need only read, watch and listen to news reports or call the Missouri secretary of state's office and ask about the petition filed to place another amendment (a gay rights amendment) on the same ballot. Homosexual activists are constantly pushing a sort of in-your-face sexual revolution that demands first tolerance and then acceptance, followed by societal condoning and finally protection of their behavior as normal and acceptable. They want it their way or no way. When one group forces its values (or lack thereof) on society and demands special rights and privileges because of its behavior, others not in agreement for whatever reasons lose their rights because they are subordinated to the homosexual activists' demands.

I used the term "sexual revolution" because that's exactly what it is. It is not a civil rights issue. Homosexuals try to ride the coattails of the civil rights movement as if there is no difference between neutral, immutable qualities and the outrageous sexual behavior of the homosexual community. …

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Rights and Values in Missouri Sexual Behavior Should Not Be Basis for Special Legal Protection
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