African Envoy: Trade, Not Aid

By Freeman, Gregory | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 24, 1994 | Go to article overview

African Envoy: Trade, Not Aid


Freeman, Gregory, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


AFTER THIS WEEK, things will change.

So says Warren "Bud" Day, director of the Southern Africa Regional Program for International Voluntary Services.

Day is referring to this week's elections in South Africa, signaling the official end of apartheid in that nation. Nelson Mandela's African National Congress and F.W. DeKlerk's National Party will face off this week in elections for control of the South African government. Elections will be Tuesday through Thursday.

Day, who expects Mandela to win, said that many private, non-profit groups in southern Africa are shifting their focus toward helping development in that part of the world.

Day, a native of Carbondale, Ill., who lives in Harare, Zimbabwe, is in the United States to promote development in southern Africa and other forms of cooperation between this country and that region.

His organization is part of a newly formed coalition called the Southern Africa Educational Campaign, designed to educate the public and policy makers about issues of development in that part of the world and the impact of U.S. policies on the region. The campaign also hopes to build a strong U.S. constituency to support economic and social justice in southern Africa and strengthen partnerships between American and southern African groups with an interest in that region.

The campaign will kick off Monday in Washington, and representatives are traveling throughout the country.

Groups in this country that are part of that effort include: TransAfrica, Africare, National Conference of Negro Women, American Friends Service and Bread for the World. "It's been exciting putting together anti-apartheid and economic development groups for a common cause," he said.

Organizations in the United States have been willing to help. In Detroit, for example, the head of the local chapter of Africare is trying to develop black business connections to help development in southern Africa. "There seems to be a real excitement," he said.

"Generally speaking, Americans know little about southern Africa. With apartheid almost gone, we thought now would be a good time to educate Americans about southern Africa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

African Envoy: Trade, Not Aid
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.