Overnight Success . . . after 20 Years Gibson/miller Band Strikes Awards Gold

By Sculley, Alan | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 13, 1994 | Go to article overview

Overnight Success . . . after 20 Years Gibson/miller Band Strikes Awards Gold


Sculley, Alan, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


WHEN HE PHONED from Los Angeles on the eve of the Academy of Country Music awards, there was no mistaking the excitement in Blue Miller's voice as he considered the possibility that his rocking country group, the Gibson/Miller Band, might be honored as best new vocal group.

"I would love to (win). "I mean, I think that would be the ultimate great thing," Miller said. "But right now, all of us are just going, man, we've made it just because we got nominated. This is great. Just to be included with our peers like this, it's pretty phenomenal to me."

It's easy to see why Miller would feel a bit humbled at the prospect of receiving the award (which the Gibson/Miller Band did, in fact, win the next evening). For nearly 20 years, Miller's career led him down a twisted path that provided plenty of memories but little in the way of a financial payoff.

Miller, who's from Detroit, got his start at age 17 as a guitarist and backing vocalist for Bob Seger, playing on the albums "Back in '72" and "Bob Seger 7" before he quit to pursue his own career.

"I've kicked myself in the rear many time for that," Miller said.

He went to Florida, where he was in a bar band, then moved on to an extended stint in Atlanta, where he played on commercial jingles, produced demo recordings for other artists and spent time playing soul music in Isaac Hayes' band. Finally, three years ago, he moved to Nashville.

Miller's partner in the band, guitarist/singer Dave Gibson, also had spent many years in the music industry. He begain in the Chicago folk scene, playing for a decade on the same circuit that produced Steve Goodman and John Prine, then moved to Nashville, where his songwriting skills earned him a niche.

One of Gibson's early songs, "Midnight Fire," became a Top 5 hit for Stever Wariner, and it was followed by a string of hits, including Joe Diffie's "Ships That Don't Come In," Alabama's "Jukebox in My Mind" and Tanya Tucker's "If It Don't Come Easy." But Gibson wasn't able to achieve his real goal - getting a record deal.

Had it not been for the intuition of Epic Records vice president Doug Johnson, who knew Miller when they worked together in an Atlanta studio, Miller and Gibson might not have got together. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Overnight Success . . . after 20 Years Gibson/miller Band Strikes Awards Gold
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.