Stone Is Placed to Mark Historic Burying Ground

By Stacy Lonati St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 13, 1994 | Go to article overview

Stone Is Placed to Mark Historic Burying Ground


Stacy Lonati St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Tucked between the softball fields and the parking lot at Wentzville High School sits a little-known cemetery with a lot of history.

The Old Walker Burying Ground is unnoticed by most who walk by. It's only about 20 feet by 20 feet. There's no sign. A chain-link fence surrounds it, and in the middle sits a lonely tree stump, covered with poison ivy.

As students paraded back from the softball fields Thursday, most said they had little knowledge of who was buried in the cemetery.

"Some Revolutionary War guy," offered Chris Ebert, a freshman. "We had to do a report on him in typing class."

Although it's no Arlington Cemetery, the tiny plot holds an important piece of local history. Among the five graves are those of veterans of the Revolutionary and Civil wars and the War of 1812.

In an effort to spread the word about the cemetery's significance, the St. Charles chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution placed a new marble headstone Thursday on the grave of Revolutionary War veteran John Castlio.

"Revolutionary War veterans were some of the first settlers of St. Charles County," said Jane Perna, DAR historian. "But you'd never know it from reading history books."

The Wentzville School District is trying to do its part, however. When construction on the high school began in the mid-1970s, the district put up the fence around the cemetery and agreed to maintain the site, says Dan Farmer, a history teacher at the school. Little is known about the beginning of the cemetery but it may have started out as a family plot on a farm.

Using the St. Charles County archives, Perna was able to document that Castlio was born sometime before 1762 in North Carolina and that he fought in the Battle of King's Mountain in 1780 in South Carolina. …

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