Opera Theatre: Showers Can't Dampen Gala Opening

By Dames, Joan | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

Opera Theatre: Showers Can't Dampen Gala Opening


Dames, Joan, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


OPERA THEATRE of St. Louis' spring gala, "Overture to Candide," filled the Pavilion at Hunter Farms on May 14.

Close to 350 people paid upward of $250 apiece, mputting the $310,000 net way past the goal of $250,000 for the matching grant for Opera Theatre.

Co-chairwomen Patty Bush and Bettie Johnson pulled off a perfect party, despite torrents of rain during cocktail time.

The tent tacked onto the pavilion protected a gravel driveway, so gguests' feet stayed dry, too. The pavilion is raised and has awning panels that were lowered to protect the guests and teak floor from the downpour on the windward side. The panels worked. Leeward was open to the night, and as the clouds cleared, Opera Theatre impresario Charles MacKay pointed to one bright star sparkling in the western sky, a star for wishing. It was MMacKay's birthday.

At evening's close, Martha Scharff spoke of the group's gratitude to Jane Hunter MacMillan and Bryan MacMillan and her son and daughter-in-law, Stephen and Kimmy Brauer, for their civic-mindness in building the pleasure dome.

Scharff said: "We all are grateful that at Hunter Farm there is such a place as the pavilion, where a synergism occurs that brings out the best in the community.

"Where else can people gather in such beautiful surroundings and interact so well?"

Desi and Mary Ann Lee underwrote fireworks that followed a fabulous concert of young Opera Theatre stars: Katherine Terrell, Pamela Dillard, Mary Dunleavy, DMark Oswald, Tony Stevenson, all accompanied by Kirt Pavitt.

The principal underwriters were Samuel R. Goldstein and the Mr. and Mrs. Lyndon C. Whitaker Charitable Foundation in honor of the late Charles "Bud" Wilkinson.

According to Patty Bush, dinner was designed around the travels of Candide, the hero of the operetta that opened Saturday, May 21. Canapes were from Candide's native Westphalia; the celeriac soup represented Paris; and the main course of grilled lamb and sweet potato cake with sauteed red, yellow and green peppers came from the mythical South American land of El Dorado, where the lamb's wool coats were of spun gold.

The happy ending for the characters of the musical show, and for the guests at dinner, was Venice. Gondolas? No. Mocha cream puffs shaped like swans floating in a pool of chocolate and orange sauce. Brava to Catering St. Louis Inc.

Laclede Gas Co. underwrote the music, which included dancing to swinging Jack Engler's Combo and Hi Fi.

Greeting guests on arrival was Bucky Bush, closely followed by Jimmy Johnson. Among the guests were: Patty and Harv Hecker with singer Elaine Bonazzi, who will appear in "Falstaff"; Nardi Hobler and Bill McCarthy; Nora and Jim Burst; Joan and Bill Kiburz; Anita and Gary Vincel and their daughter, Lucian; Joseph Dreher; Fabienne and Ed Hemmann; Sally Levy and Richard Wolfheim; Marielle Huber and Dick Hancey; Martha and Tom Hogan; Ulrike Karst and Tom Schlafly; Rosemary and Dr. Jerry Flance; Mary and Jim Siverts; Glenn and Dr. Bill Sheffield; Joanne and Alan Kohn; Barbara Bull and Hal Spener; Tineke and Peter Vermeeren, formerly of Holland, now of Chesterfield; Bob and Mary White Lucy; Bob Koetting and Mayor of Frontenac Peggy Symes; Luann and Ron Yates; Mary Ann and Dr. Pat Hogan; Marge and Bob Rosenthal; Anne Marie and Arthur Heise; Sylvia and Urban Bergbauer; Joanne Foreman; Diane and Tom Jacobsen; Roma and Ray Witcoff; Jackie and Gene Frerichs, who were celebrating their seventh wedding anniversary; Jane and Whitney Harris; Helen and Julian Seeherman; Sally and Jack Parriott; Jan Greenberg; Dr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Opera Theatre: Showers Can't Dampen Gala Opening
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.