Cancer Fraud Found at 11 Sites Officials Cite False Data, Poor Records, Misplaced Evidence

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 16, 1994 | Go to article overview

Cancer Fraud Found at 11 Sites Officials Cite False Data, Poor Records, Misplaced Evidence


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


At least 11 institutions falsified data, failed to enroll patients properly or misplaced key evidence in a national breast cancer research project, officials told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday.

A review of clinical trial records at 120 of the 500 institutions taking part in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project found what one official called "serious problems." (Adjuvant is something that enhances the effectiveness of medical treatment.)

These problems were discovered at two sites in Pittsburgh, two in California, two in Montreal, two in New Orleans, one in Chicago and one in New York. One site was not identified.

Dr. Bernard Fisher, who until March directed the $9 million project, took responsibility for what he called administrative errors.

Fisher was removed after it was disclosed that researchers at St. Luc Hospital and St. Mary's Hospital in Montreal had falsified data. For 27 years Fisher had been in charge of the national cancer research effort based at the University of Pittsburgh.

The data falsification, which started in the 1980s at St. Luc, was known by project officials and by the National Cancer Institute for months before it became public. The investigation has found problems at these hospitals:

Memorial Cancer Research Foundation in Los Angeles.

The University of California at Davis.

Tulane University, New Orleans.

Louisiana State University, New Orleans.

The University of Pittsburgh.

St. Joseph's Hospital, Pittsburgh.

Rush Presbyterian, Chicago.

South Nassau Communities Hospital, Long Island, N.Y.

Some of the problems have been known by auditors of the national research project for up to four years, but Fisher and project officials took no action, said Rep. …

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Cancer Fraud Found at 11 Sites Officials Cite False Data, Poor Records, Misplaced Evidence
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