Dangerous Part Comes Back Home

By McGuire, John M. | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 29, 1994 | Go to article overview

Dangerous Part Comes Back Home


McGuire, John M., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


FROM LEWIS AND CLARK on, the confluence of the country's two major rivers north of St. Louis has been an irresistible lure. Whether it's adventurers, writers, photographers, Green Berets, swimmers, scientists - the Missouri and Mississippi have drawn all types, madcap and otherwise.

W. Hodding Carter and Preston Maybank are decidedly of the madcap variety among those who have retraced the Lewis and Clark trail.

Before they left here in August two years ago, two other Lewis and Clark voyagers - a chiropractor and a teacher - took off in a 21-foot jet boat, powered by a 270-horsepower engine. "They were well prepared and had sponsors up the wazoo," said Carter. "Their exploits made People magazine, The Washington Post, USA Today, to name a few. My intention - before I had to postpone our departure - was to leave at the same time and playfully antagonize them along the way."

Too bad these two weren't around in May 1971, when four boatloads of Special Forces soldiers parachuted into East Alton Civic Memorial Airport, to start their Lewis and Clark thing.

The 25 soldiers - all Vietnam veterans - would have been fun to antagonize. They camped out the night before they left in the Lewis and Clark Park south of Alton. …

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