Warning to Gop: Don't Overreach

By David Broder Copyright Washington Post Writers Group | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 4, 1995 | Go to article overview

Warning to Gop: Don't Overreach


David Broder Copyright Washington Post Writers Group, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


To the Republicans taking control today of the House of Representatives, let this column offer congratulations - and a few words of caution.

The 230 of you - and particularly the third who are freshmen - have done something no other Republicans have been able to do in 42 years: oust the Democrats who ran the place as a perpetual political fiefdom. And you did it on your own, without the help of a victorious president/war hero like Dwight D. Eisenhower, whose coattails provided the GOP with its last (and short-lived) House majority back in 1952.

You ran a smart campaign - and a serious one. The Contract With America that almost all your winners signed last September has its dubious planks. But it is a start on a coherent program for governing. The decisions on committee structure and assignments, made by Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., and his leadership team, are clearly designed to see that the promises of quick action are kept.

So far, so good. Now, on the assumption that the swearing-in celebrations will have done enough to inflate your freshman egos, let me raise a few caution flags.

(1) Remember recent history. Two years ago, the Democrats, with a freshman class almost as large as yours, was celebrating its political triumph in the chamber where you meet. Having recaptured the White House for the first time in 12 years, the congressional Democrats were confident they had a mandate to govern and a program that the voters would applaud. They guessed wrong.

(2) Do not underestimate the voters' impatience - or their distrust of Washington. Like Bill Clinton, you have promised speedy action, as an antidote to voter cynicism about politicians' broken promises. (You may recall his 100-day deadline for the introduction of health-care legislation; it took him a year.) The voters will grant you some leeway, but they won't cut you a lot of slack. cic

(3) Recognize the "boomer burden." Most of you fall into that massive generation born in the 15 years after the end of World War II. Politically, the "boomers" have been a bust. The leaders they have put forward too often have failed to win the trust of their contemporaries, let alone those older and younger. From David Stockman and Dan Quayle to Mike Espy and Clinton, enough of them have done things that raised questions about their fitness for high office that the burden of proof now falls on all in their generation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Warning to Gop: Don't Overreach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.