Students Get a Taste of College Atmosphere Juniors, Seniors Taken on Tours of Campuses to Chart Their Futures

By Raymond W. Vodicka Of the St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 17, 1995 | Go to article overview

Students Get a Taste of College Atmosphere Juniors, Seniors Taken on Tours of Campuses to Chart Their Futures


Raymond W. Vodicka Of the St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Juniors and seniors at St. Charles High School are getting a taste of college campus life before they graduate.

In what counselors believe is the only such program in the county, they take bus loads of students several times a winter to college campuses around the state. On these one-day trips, students get a first-hand look at the campuses and a chance to talk to administrators. Best of all, they are able to talk to St. Charles High graduates attending those universities.

The students' interests dictate which schools they visit, said John Smith, head counselor at the high school. In order to go, the students must have a grade-point average of at least 2.0. They go on school time, and the only cost for them is their share of the bus trip and lunch, a total of $20 to $30.

Smith said he came up with the idea when he took his daughter and several of her friends to visit Southwest Missouri State University in Springfield in 1989. "It just kind of evolved," he said. He took his first group of students from school in 1990. This past fall, he and John Prinster, the other counselor involved, took 43 students to the University of Missouri at Columbia, 38 to Lindenwood College, 33 to Northeast Missouri State University at Kirksville and 25 students and three parents to Southwest.

The program, said Prinster, can change minds. After a trip, some students find they know where they don't want to go. "They're better able to make a choice," he said. "It's most important to have as much information as they can have."

A sampling of students who have gone on trips this winter indicates they feel it's time well spent.

Junior Andrea Konnerth took trips to Northeast and Southwest. Both have education programs and equestrian teams, two of her interests. Because of what she found on the trips, she's leaning toward Southwest, which has a larger education department.

She said there's an advantage to visiting a campus on an organized trip with a group. "You get an overview. Everything is pretty well set up and more organized."

She still plans on returning to the schools with her parents to take a closer look at what they have to offer.

Senior Jason Callaway wants to study psychology in college. After visiting both the Springfield and Columbia campuses, he said, he "felt more comfortable at MU. It felt more homey." Without the trips, he said, he probably would not have had any idea of what to expect.

"It was a fun experience to get the tour of the colleges and see what the campus is like," he said. "You can ask any question you have, and they'll have an answer for it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Students Get a Taste of College Atmosphere Juniors, Seniors Taken on Tours of Campuses to Chart Their Futures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.