Alaskan Malamutes Focus of Dog Museum's Program

By Pamela Selbert St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 23, 1995 | Go to article overview

Alaskan Malamutes Focus of Dog Museum's Program


Pamela Selbert St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Alaskan malamutes are magnificent dogs, says Diana Edwards of St. Louis. They're smart and good with children.

"But don't ever be tempted to buy one without giving the matter a second thought - or even a third or fourth one," said Edwards, 42, who owns four of them. "Malamutes are working dogs - and if you don't find work for them to do, they'll find their own" - and it might be digging up a yard or tearing up a house.

Edwards will give a program about the breed at 1 p.m. Jan. 29 at the Dog Museum, 1721 South Mason Road.

Bred originally by the Inuit Indians in Alaska, the malamute dates back 5,000 years, said Edwards. They hauled freight.

That made size important, said Edwards. "According to American Kennel Club standards today, a male malamute can stand up to 25 inches at the shoulder and weigh 85 pounds, and a female can stand 23 inches and weigh 75 pounds."

Now that they're eating high-protein chow instead of fish and whale blubber, the breed has grown, she said.

"Some breeders think bigger is better and are raising malamutes that weigh as much as 185 pounds," said Edwards. "But I don't encourage that much weight, as it puts too much stress on the dog's hips and can cause damage if he pulls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Alaskan Malamutes Focus of Dog Museum's Program
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.