Feud Taxes Marissa Police

By Robert Goodrich Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 23, 1995 | Go to article overview

Feud Taxes Marissa Police


Robert Goodrich Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A neighborhood feud in Marissa has escalated to the point that police consider the situation a serious danger.

Gary Ripley, 56, of 108 West Marissa Street, says that over the past six months neighbors have falsely accused him of poisoning their cats, letting his dogs bark at night, beating on a steel drum to annoy them, trying to pick fights and even of abusing his 4-year-old son.

He said he and his wife, Debra, were investigated by the Department of Children and Family Services on the abuse allegation and it was ruled "unfounded." The only abuse his son has suffered was from neighbors who threw dirt in his face and called him names, Ripley said.

Ripley has complained about his neighbors to local police, to half a dozen state and federal agencies, even to the NAACP, even though he is white.

Police Chief Michael Kerperian says every officer in his six-member department has been called to the scene repeatedly. "The only thing we're trying to do is squelch a neighborhood dispute before somebody gets hurt," he said.

Ripley recently filed complaints of racial bias with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Illinois Department of Human Rights for remarks he said his neighbors made when he listed his mobile home for sale.

The neighbors warned him against selling to blacks, and used racial epithets, he said.

Based on other complaints by Ripley's neighbors, he and his wife were charged last August with disorderly conduct - yelling threats and obscenities. An additional disorderly conduct charge was lodged against Ripley - beating on a steel drum with a piece of lumber. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Feud Taxes Marissa Police
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.