Dear Abbey: Dinner Feeds Priory School Scholarship Fund

By Dames, Joan | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 5, 1995 | Go to article overview

Dear Abbey: Dinner Feeds Priory School Scholarship Fund


Dames, Joan, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


MORE THAN 500 GUESTS attended the Ninth Annual Black Tie Dinner on Saturday at the Ritz-Carlton, given by the Fathers' Club of the St. Louis Priory School, which benefits the school's scholarship fund. In the previous eight years, $700,000 has been netted.

Guests assembled for hot and cold canapes, drinks and din in the crowded anteroom before an unsuccessful attempt to herd them into dinner at 7:15. Alas, it was not meant to be. The lights blinked, chimes sounded the bars closed, but it was past 7:30 when the crowd moved into supper. Abbot Luke Rigby had to sound a crystal bell repeatedly into the microphone to bring silence.

Swell party this was.

The guests were assembled at last and some brief and witty speeches given by dinner chairman Ted Williams, Abbot Luke and the Rev. Thomas Frerking, headmaster of the school.

Two distinguished patrons of the St. Louis Abbey, Margaret Mudd Fletcher and her brother, Dayton Henry Mudd, received the Luke Rigby Award for Outstanding Service to the Abbey of Saint Mary and St. Louis. It is the Priory's highest honor.

What "Muddie," "D.H." and their late brother Dr. Gerry Mudd did was donate the Abbey Church. In addition, they let the monks choose their own architect and design to create what one distinguished visitor called "a song in concrete."

The Abbey Church may be one of the most distinctive architectural works in our community. If you've never seen it, drive north on Mason Road from Highway 40 and take a peek, or, better still, stay and pray a while.

The first course was blackened smoked duck medallion with pepper and basil pasta, so delicious one wanted to stop eating at that point to keep the taste on the tongue a little longer. Veal roulade with mushrooms was the next course, served with vegetables and followed by salad and dessert that included St. Louis Abbey cookies.

The tables were laid with white lace cloths and centered with a winsome arrangment of rubrum lilies in clear glass, arranged by Marie-Agnes Seuc.

There was dancing.

In front of the ballroom outside was parked the 1995 Ford Mustang that will be auctioned Sunday, Feb. 5 at the Xanadu XXVI Auction, along with a QE2 cruise around Great Britain, a Super Bowl XXX package for two, dinner with the Benedictine monks in the Saint Louis Abbey, NCAA Final Four package for two, a 1949 Chevy fruit and vegetable truck, Austrian Airline tickets for two to Vienna, and a New York extravaganza for two.

These are just a few of the auction items that Xanadu chairwomen Ann Gallardo and Pat McAtee have in store for their guests in the gymnasium of The Priory School.

Among the guests last Saturday night were Trary and Jimmy Barnes; Donna and Jerry Smith; Marilyn and Hank Schake; Claude and Mickey Gennaoui; Sherri Williams; Beverly and A.J. Morrow; Carol and Steve Higgins; Cindy and Brad Marrs, president of the Fathers' Club; Jo Medart; Brother Simeon Gillette; Anne Crane; Dorothy Mudd; Mark Loyd; Elaine and John Edwards; Father Gregory Mohrman; Joanne Manewal; Elizabeth Mudd; Don Bussmann; Mary Lou and George Convy; Diane Rabenau; Janice and Rick Harrison; Vicki Warner and Ron Riano; Susan and Gene Kalhorn; Betty and Frank Bush; Harriet Switzer and David Cronin; Grania and Dr. Kevin Martin; Father Paul Kidner; Maureen and Jim Werner; Barbara and Dr. David Brigham; Roxy and George Kesler; Patricia and Jim Sinner; Margaret Marsh; Steve and Carol Marsh; Therese and Jim Sullivan; Mary and Greg Taylor; Molly and Ted Wight; Graciela and Louis Desloge; Norine and Robert Nischwitz; Mary and Bill Leber; Jane Brown; Emily and Bob McCaffrey from Sea Island, Ga.; Joanne Harvey; Sue and Bo Naunheim; Father Benedict Allin; Mary Ann Morgan.

The Arts & Education Council of Greater St. …

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