CONGRESS TARGETS JOB-TRAINING FUNDS PROGRAMS CALLED REDUNDANT, IN NEED OF CONSOLIDATION Series: The Contract and You an Occasional Series

By Charlotte Grimes Post-Dispatch Washington Bureau | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 16, 1995 | Go to article overview

CONGRESS TARGETS JOB-TRAINING FUNDS PROGRAMS CALLED REDUNDANT, IN NEED OF CONSOLIDATION Series: The Contract and You an Occasional Series


Charlotte Grimes Post-Dispatch Washington Bureau, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Every Tuesday and Thursday, David Imhof drives from his south St. Louis County home to the Louderman Building downtown. It is a trek of hope, a triumph of ambition over despair, and a habit from 27 years of work.

On a gray wall of the Louderman Building's 8th floor, cut-out paper stars of neon purple, yellow and blue shout success stories: Jobs landed by graduates of the federally funded Worker Re-Entry Program run by St. Louis Community College. Among them: A TWA flight attendant, four electricians, an actuary, a machinist, a union benefits clerk.

Imhof wants a star with his name on it. "I want to find a job," says Imhof, who lost his position as a warehouseman last year. "I'm not afraid of any work."

Imhof is at the heart of Congress' debate on the Republican proposal to cut and consolidate the scores of often overlapping federal job-training programs. So are thousands of welfare mothers who've never had a job, auto workers who watched production move south to Mexico, high school dropouts who can't find work, executives who've lost jobs in corporate downsizing - anyone confronting the dramatically changing economy without modernized skills.

To Republicans and Democrats alike, there are too many programs like the one Imhof is in. The Labor Department alone has six programs to train laid-off workers.

But for Imhof the program is a lifeline.

Imhof is learning to type - he's up to 10 words a minute - to network, to fill out applications, to write resumes. On Fridays, he attends computer classes.

They're all skills that Imhof, at 45, never imagined he would need. He started to work for Edison Brothers Stores as a warehouse "picker" - fetching items from the shelves - right out of Roosevelt High School in 1968.

"Back then you just knocked on the door and asked the secretary, `Are they hiring?' " he recalls. He was supervising 25 people by the time Edison Brothers managers summoned the 122 employees to the cafeteria on a July morning and told them that, come 1995, the warehouse would close. They would be out of work.

"People were devastated," says Imhof. Without the Worker Re-Entry Program, he doesn't know what he'd do. "Otherwise," he says, "you just sit home and watch TV."

With a cost of between $12 billion and $25 billion each year, the federal government has stocked a tool-box full of job training programs. Depending on who's counting, the number ranges from 55 major programs to 163.

Republicans are calling for the extinction of many programs and the consolidation of others as part of their Contract with America.

Democrats, who've made stabs in the past at controlling the ever-growing number of programs, are on the political defensive. Privately, the stoutest defenders of federal job training admit it's a patchwork jumble stitched together with bureaucracy. But they worry that those who need job training will get short shrift in a consolidation-frenzy.

In the Senate, Sen. Nancy Kassebaum, R-Kan., plans to introduce legislation later this month to turn job-training programs over to the states in block grants. Kassebaum is chairwoman of the Labor and Human Resources Committee and a leading critic of the patchwork programs.

In recent hearings she has raised concerns about the Job Corps, with reports of gang-related violence and drug abuse at some centers.

In other hearings some workers have complained of getting lost in a paperwork shuffle.

Ernestine Dunn of Seattle testified that she was trapped for 12 years in eight different superficial training programs that left her stuck on welfare.

The programs offered nothing more than practice at job interviews and resume writing. No one bothered to test her basic reading and math abilities or try to match her interests with a career.

Finally, in 1993, she got in a program to teach women non-traditional skills. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

CONGRESS TARGETS JOB-TRAINING FUNDS PROGRAMS CALLED REDUNDANT, IN NEED OF CONSOLIDATION Series: The Contract and You an Occasional Series
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.