Illinois Supreme Court Reinstates Charges against Gynecologist Dismissal of Sex Abuse Case by St. Clair County Judge Is Overturned

By Robert Goodrich Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 18, 1995 | Go to article overview

Illinois Supreme Court Reinstates Charges against Gynecologist Dismissal of Sex Abuse Case by St. Clair County Judge Is Overturned


Robert Goodrich Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The Illinois Supreme Court on Friday reinstated eight criminal sexual assault charges against gynecologist Dr. Carl Burpo of Belleville.

The charges had been dismissed by a St. Clair County judge on grounds that the criminal law governing gynecological exams was unconstitutionally vague.

But Supreme Court Justice James D. Heiple wrote, "When a gynecologist intentionally exceeds the scope of reasonable medical standards, the patient's consent is vitiated, and the physician may be prosecuted."

Burpo's former defense attorney, Clyde L. Kuehn, who is now a circuit judge, had argued that a physician could be accused of a crime for every such gynecological exam by the very nature of what it requires.

The charges against Burpo are based on accusations by patients who said his behavior while examining them went beyond medical procedure to involve fondling and sexual molestation - although none claimed he attempted sexual intercourse.

Burpo has steadfastly denied all accusations. Kuehn said the doctor suffered from Parkinson's disease. That and some of his medications caused his hands to tremble, vision problems and awkwardness that may have been misinterpreted by patients, Kuehn has said.

The Supreme Court ruled that the prosecution must prove a gynecologist had criminal intent, or acted with knowledge or recklessness, to obtain a conviction. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Illinois Supreme Court Reinstates Charges against Gynecologist Dismissal of Sex Abuse Case by St. Clair County Judge Is Overturned
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.