Wynton Marsalis He Merges Worlds of Jazz and Classical, to Great Effect

By Harris, Paul A. | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 19, 1995 | Go to article overview

Wynton Marsalis He Merges Worlds of Jazz and Classical, to Great Effect


Harris, Paul A., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


BEING ONE of America's most versatile musicians will win you a good deal of respect in most circles. By the same token, versatility can also make you an attractive target, as trumpeter Wynton Marsalis has learned.

Jealous jazz players, especially those of the avant-garde persuasion, occasionally take the 33-year-old virtuoso to task for being too "traditional" - for tending to the roots of a musical form they insist demands constant invention. Some of those jazz performers also wonder aloud, now and then, why Wynton continues to devote some of his time to classical (i.e., European-derived) music.

And over on the classical side, conductors and other insiders have expressed bewilderment at the notion that a man with Marsalis' superior technique could more or less abandon that form as far as live performances are concerned.

Although he continues to make classical recordings - his latest album features trumpet concertos by Haydn, Hummel and Leopold Mozart (with the London Concert conducted by former St. Louis Symphony Orchestra principal guest conductor Raymond Leppard) - Marsalis dramatically scaled back his activities in the classical domain in the late '80s to concentrate more on jazz.

In the face of the ire that flies at him from various points on the musical compass, Marsalis seems to maintain a fairly even temperament. He refuses to buy into notions of musical exclusivity.

"Sophistication is sophistication," he insists. "And it comes in any form, be it European, African, Caribbean, Chinese, Japanese . . . I travel all around the world. I know musicians in every culture by name.

"Now if anybody thinks that the tradition of Bach and Beethoven and Haydn and Debussy and Mozart can be disrespected, or that it goes against the traditions of African music - or that it goes against any other world traditions - they are sadly mistaken. All these traditions in music can work together."

Currently the jazz director of New York's Lincoln Center, Marsalis will present a brand-new band, the Wynton Marsalis Septet, Sunday night at Powell Hall.

Asked whether the quartet will in any way echo the traditional jazz inclinations of his celebrated septet, which appeared at Powell Hall three years ago, the trumpeter senses yet another musical red flag being hoisted.

"Of course, the music will always be reflected in the musicians in the band," he responds evenly. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wynton Marsalis He Merges Worlds of Jazz and Classical, to Great Effect
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.