Management and Workers Differ on `Downsizing'

By Landers, Ann | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 17, 1995 | Go to article overview

Management and Workers Differ on `Downsizing'


Landers, Ann, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dear Ann Landers: The letter you printed about the downsizing of corporate America hit a bull's eye. My old company laid off secretaries, engineers, mail clerks and telephone personnel because profits were falling. The same brain-dead management that hasn't had a bright idea or taken a risk in 10 years still calls the shots. They stack the deck so there are more benefits for themselves. They couldn't care less about us working stiffs.

I am now self-employed because I cannot bear to put up with any more management morons. DANBURY, CONN.

*****

The letter I ran on downsizing produced a firestorm of angry mail from both management and "the working stiffs." The anti-management responses were especially hostile. Take a look:

From Dallas: Your response to "Burnt Out" tells me that when it comes to corporate America, you don't have a clue. Managers know the company is understaffed, the employees are overworked and morale is low. They don't give a damn because they have the power. If you complain, your name goes to the top of the hit list, and you are out of there.

Moundsville, W.Va.: I am a coal miner. There are weeks in the winter when I don't see daylight. There have been times when I ate my lunch at the end of a 10- or 12-hour day. The only way I can get a weekend off is to be sick or get hurt. The company has downsized to a third of what the work force used to be, and the production has almost tripled. I would love to quit this stinkin' job, but I don't dare. I have a family to feed.

Oklahoma: The lady who wrote about burnout needs to see the other side of the picture. I run a bakery and put in 74 hours a week. My so-called "day" starts at 1 a.m. The person who wrote said, "Overworked, unappreciated employees produce poor service, shoddy workmanship and faulty products." I'd like to tell her a thing or two. I spend half my time hunting for help. People say they want to work, but that's a lie. …

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