Offensive Language in Creative Writing? No Way

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 26, 1995 | Go to article overview

Offensive Language in Creative Writing? No Way


Offensive language is absolutely unnecessary in creative writing or, for that matter, in movies, speaking or anywhere else. It is certainly possible to get one's point across without the use of vulgarity.

Maybe if teachers would start teaching their students such things as vocabulary and effective writing skills instead of always trying to boost students' self-esteem and creativeness, today's students would know how to express their feelings in writing. I thought students were supposed to learn important skills in school so they could get a good job and stay toff the streets. Instead we are going to have a country full of part-time McDonald's employees earning minimum wage. The only thing they are going to know is that their third grade teacher told them to feel good about themselves.egar

I think students should be taught the traditional subjects like math and science, be reprimanded when they are wrong, and they can do their creative writing at home. If students were given some vocal reprimanding instead of self-esteem pep talks, they might be more responsible and successful. Christina Gentsch Junior, Rosati Kain High

*****

Students should not be able to use offensive language because it could cause many problems between parents and the school district. The parents may chose another school or homeschool their children. Some kids may get carried away with bad language, and it also teaches kids that it's alright to say such words all the time. Offensive language could contribute to a hostile environment for students. Nick Jones 8th Grade, Wellsville-Middletown R-1

*****

The first thing people should be concerned with is the fact that profanity and obscenity are already unacceptable in the classroom environment. Teachers should not allow students to express themselves through profanity and obscenity because it is against school policy. The teachers play a role of authority by not letting student use explicit language in their creative writing assignments.

Many people say today's youth are headed for a downfall. Many people complain about the respect youths are lacking; but, by the same token, we allow youth to get away with too much. When students are allowed to use profanity and obscenity in writing assignments, they are showing a disrespect toward their school, their parents and their teachers. Natalie R. Days Senior, Normandy Senior High

*****

Creative writing inherently involves the use of descriptive or vivid language. However, diction that is offensive to most people is very inappropriate for a class assignment. Rather than simply bowing to "political correctness," student writers, encouraged by their teachers, should try to transmit ideas and feelings without resorting to vulgarity. …

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