Don't Protect Securities Fraud

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 9, 1995 | Go to article overview

Don't Protect Securities Fraud


The House has passed and the Senate is considering a bill to make it much harder for defrauded investors to bring class-action suits against investment firms that defraud them, as well as the accountants who helped them. The impetus for such legislation is the same as that driving tort revision, only with even less justification.

The Senate bill is sponsored by New Mexico Republican Pete Domenici and, surprisingly, Christopher Dodd, Democrat of Connecticut. Though its final provisions have yet to be settled, it is likely to restrict significantly the rights of small investors to sue for fraud.

The industry's complaint: The explosion of securities litigation needs to be curbed. But there isn't one; the number of suits has remained nearly constant in the last 20 years, despite huge growth in the volume of securities. However, recent events have created a new problem: Many accounting firms that put their names to false documents during the junk bond craze and the thrift debacle are finding themselves in court more often than ever before. They want protection. This bill would give it to them.

It would prohibit lawyers and accountants from being named as primary defendants in a class action unless the plaintiffs first can show that these defendants had actual knowledge of the fraud and the precise state of mind of those they helped perpetrate it. …

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