Talk-Show Host Keyes Doubts Clinton Motive Gop Hopeful Discounts Words on Violence

By Fred W. Lindecke Missouri Political Correspondent | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 10, 1995 | Go to article overview

Talk-Show Host Keyes Doubts Clinton Motive Gop Hopeful Discounts Words on Violence


Fred W. Lindecke Missouri Political Correspondent, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


GOP presidential candidate Alan Keyes said Tuesday that President Bill Clinton is more concerned about the political damage that talk radio could do to him than he is about violence that talk-show hosts might encourage.

Keyes, one of eight candidates for the Republican presidential nomination, made his first visit to the St. Louis area since announcing his candidacy in March. Keyes, 44, is a talk show host in Baltimore who ran unsuccessfully for the Senate in Maryland in 1988 and 1992.

After the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, Clinton condemned some talk-show hosts as "purveyors of hatred and division."

In an interview at the Post-Dispatch, Keyes said Clinton "is not worried that talk-show hosts are encouraging people to use bullets. He's upset because we encourage them to use ballots. And in 1994 they did use the ballot, and they kicked his buddies out of Congress. So now, every chance he gets, he's trying to turn people against them."

Keyes attended a fund-raising reception at the St. Louis Club in Clayton and then a rally Tuesday night at the Viking Convention Center in Sunset Hills.

A cornerstone of his campaign is a commitment that the Republican Party "does not retreat from its pro-life stance." He also emphasizes the "breakdown of the marriage-based, two-parent family."

Keyes said he opposed gun control because "it's based on a phony premise that objects are responsible for human behavior. …

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